LORETTA LYNN FAN WEBSITE

Loretta Lynn Fan Website, Cissie Lynn, The Lynns, Tayla Lynn, Mooney Lynn, Peggy Lynn, Patsy Lynn, Betty Sue Lynn, Jack Benny Lynn, Crystal Gayle, Butcher Hollow, Butcher Holler,Ernie Lynn, Ernest Ray Lynn, Peggy Sue Wright, Sonny Wright, Tim Cobb

LORETTA NEWS Archives 4

Singers Have A Ball On Album Dedicated To 'Honky Tonk Girl' Loretta Lynn

by Robert Christgau

Loretta Lyn at the CMAs in November. Frederick Breedon/FilmMagic Loretta Lynn (middle) performs onstage at the CMAs in Novemner. Sheryl Crow (left) and Miranda Lambert sang with her

Tribute compilations rarely do anybody justice. Recorded by disparate artists under disparate circumstances, they're inconsistent by definition. But every now and then one jells like Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn. The title track is sung by Miranda Lambert, then Sheryl Crow and Loretta Lynn herself.

The occasion of this 12-track collection is the 50th anniversary of Lynn's first record and first hit, "I'm a Honky Tonk Girl." In 1960, her sound was pretty hayseed by the standards of the time, even those of country radio.

On the tribute record, however, Lee Ann Womack takes the same milestone song just a little harder and more country the ornamentation is more pronounced, the accent a touch thicker.

Almost all the women here go for such slight exaggerations, which reminds us of what Loretta Lynn achieved for so many of the female country singers whose career paths followed hers: the freedom to make hay off the speech and sounds they grew up with, stylizing them and reveling in them. On my favorite example, Oklahoma-born American Idol winner Carrie Underwood covers Lynn's "You're Looking at Country."

Even if Underwood is pushing it a little, she's also having a ball. So are a whole bunch of female singers who want the world to know how much they owe the honky tonk girl Gretchen Wilson, Allison Moorer, Reba McEntire, Martina McBride. Duet partners Alan Jackson and Steve Earle let loose too.

By comparison, White Stripe Jack White sounds slightly out of place even though was he the one who reignited Lynn's late career by arranging and producing her Van Lear Rose in 2004. Coal Miner's Daughter is for country's ladies, including hard-rocking Tennessee pop idol Hayley Williams of Paramore, who fits right in just singing and strumming an acoustic guitar.


2010 Rewind: No. 10 Loretta Lynns 50th Leads Legends

Tom Roland:

Loretta Lynn photo courtesy of Sony Music Nashville.

It was quite a year for the Coal Miners Daughter 2010 marked the 50th anniversary of Loretta Lynns emergence as a national star, and she was honored in a slew of ways, including parties, awards and a tribute album by some of todays top artists.

Loretta was joined by several other legends as 2010 honorees, including Merle Haggard, Jimmy Dean and now Dolly Parton. The recognition paid to the genres pioneering acts represents the No. 10 entry in our countdown of country musics dozen top stories of the year.

Lorettas first single, Im A Honky Tonk Girl, came out in 1960, and it seemed like every few months during 2010, the music business found some way to pay homage to her impact. Early in the year, she was accorded a Lifetime Achievement Grammy, though she was unable to attend the Los Angeles ceremony. Coal Miners Daughter was added to the National Recording Registry, she was saluted with an anniversary party at her Tennessee home, she was celebrated with a Reba McEntire-hosted Recording Academy Salute at the Ryman Auditorium, and a bunch of her classics were remade in the album Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn.

That latter project brought Loretta the opportunity to sing the title track with Miranda Lambert and Sheryl Crow on the Country Music Association Awards. The album also features Lee Ann Womack, Kid Rock, the White Stripes, Alan Jackson and Carrie Underwood, among others. Loretta hand-picked all of the contributors appropriate, because shes not one of those veteran stars who dislikes newer versions of country music.

I love the old country music, dont get me wrong, she says. But I love the pop-flavored country songs that they come out with, too. I like the polished country music that they do today. Im not sayin I can do it, but I love it. I love the old country, and I love the new.

A "Coal Miner's Daughter" sings for America

image Image of Loretta Lynn (image by nesster (by:cc))

Loretta Lynn's "Coal Miner's Daughter" gave a voice to marginalized Americans.

This story was originally covered by PRI's Studio360. For more, listen to the audio above.

In 1970, a country song about growing up in hard times in the in the Appalachian Mountains hit number one on Billboard's country music charts. The success of "Coal Miner's Daughter," by Loretta Lynn was a surprise, even to her. "You wouldn't think that anybody else would be interested in your life that much, you know?" Lynn says, recalling the success of this autobiographical tune. While she was skeptical about the song's audience because, "there ain't that many coal miner's daughters."

Songwriter/producer Jack White of The White Stripes, told PRI's Studio 360 that the song had a much broader appeal. To him, "Coal Miner's Daughter" is the story of unrepresented Americans. "She is telling the tale that a million other Appalachian American people never got to tell about their own life story, and how beautiful of a thing when someone who is in a position of power can relate a story for people who don't have a voice."

Musician Harold Ray Bradley describes Lynn's song another way: "When I hear Loretta singing, I hear America singing."

With songs like "The Pill," and "One's on the Way," Loretta Lynn broke ground by speaking honestly from a woman's perspective. White sees Lynn as the "ultimate feminist songwriter." "She told me 14 of her songs had been banned by country radio over the years," White says. "And you know if you have your music banned, it's probably got some deeper cultural meaning."

At the song's end, Lynn sings about her childhood home, which has crumbled away. This year, the Library of Congress added "Coal Miner's Daughter" to the National Recording Registry, ensuring that the memories of an American childhood are permanently preserved. 

PRI's Peabody Award-winning "Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen" from WNYC is public radio's smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy -- so let "Studio 360" steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life.

Loretta Lynn reflects on 50 years in country music

PETER COOPER:
half-century ago, Loretta Lynn was driving cross-country with husband Mooney Doolittle Lynn, handing records to disc jockeys and hoping to get some airplay.

She got the airplay, of course. And the record deals, and ultimately the book deals, the movie deal, the Grammy Awards and the membership in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

In this anniversary year, tributes to Lynn have flowed, with a Grammy Salute at the Ryman Auditorium, the re-release of her Coal Miners Daughter autobiography and a new, multi-artist album called Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn.

The latter effort features stars of rock (The White Stripes, Paramore, Kid Rock), country (Alan Jackson, Miranda Lambert, Faith Hill) and Americana (Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle, Allison Moorer) singing the songs Lynn popularized. There was plenty of material from which to choose, as Lynn has put her past half-century to good and prolific use.

Lynn spoke with The Tennessean from her home in Hurricane Mills.

Fifty years is a long time to stay in the music spotlight. What was your life like when you began trying to carve out a career?

    "For one thing, I had four kids in school when I started singing, and back in them days I didnt have a washing machine or any of that.

    "I was scared to death about singing, but I wasnt going to let that stop me. My husband, Doolittle, believed in me, so I had to do it. He told me I could sing, and I couldnt let him down. So Id sing and Id rock them babies.

    "The first songs I wrote that got recorded were 'Honky Tonk Girl' and 'Whispering Sea,' and I wrote them in the same day, sitting outside by the toilet, on a $17 guitar that couldnt stay in tune. I remember writing those two songs and not ever thinking anybody would hear them. Six months later, I was on a little record label, going across the country with Doolittle."

You were taking your records to little radio stations and handing them to disc jockeys on that cross-country trip. It wound up working, since they played the records, and eventually people in Nashville paid attention. What if it hadnt worked?

    "I never even thought of it not working. And the more it became obvious that it was helping, the harder I worked at it."

Did you like the early songs you wrote?

    "I didnt know any better, so I thought it was great. I didnt know that it wasnt. I tried to sing like Kitty Wells at first, because I love Kitty Wells, but everything Ive ever written was about me. I had to put my heart and soul into all of them. Id close my eyes and go through it in my mind. You know, youve got to close your eyes when youre a writer. You need to get to yourself, and get into it."

People all think of you as being from a place called Butcher Holler, Ky., but in fact there was no such thing as Butcher Holler until you named it that in the song Coal Miners Daughter, which came out in 1970.

    "I was the first one that called it 'Butcher Holler.' It didnt sound right to sing 'Webb Holler,' which is what it was called. My grandma was a Butcher and my grandpa was a Webb, and there were as many Butchers as Webbs up there. But its Butcher Holler now, ever since that song. Theyve got signs that point you to Butcher Holler."

In Coal Miners Daughter, you sing, I never thought of ever leaving Butcher Holler. You left at age 13, after you married Doolittle. Did you ever regret moving away?

    "Never once did I regret moving. I loved being there, but it was not easy. I was the one that had to make sure the water was in the house at night, and in the wintertime it was so cold that the water would freeze. Our toilet was way out behind the barn at that time. It was rough, but it makes a better person out of you. When you do have something, you appreciate it a little more."

At this point, you have a lot. And theres a new tribute album with other singers paying their respects. What does that album mean to you?

    "When I heard about it, I thought, Gosh, people still love me.

Surely you knew that.

    "Its nice to know they remember you. And everybody sang the songs they wanted to sing. I love the way Kid Rock did 'I Know How.' I cut it real slow, and he changed it up and did something that was great. And the one little girl, the rock singer, Hayley (Williams) from Paramore, she did 'You Aint Woman Enough (To Take My Man)' just with rhythm guitar and her voice, and its something else. I love all of it."

What was the hardest time in your career?

    "Probably when Doolittle got sick, that was the most difficult time. I didnt hit the road hardly for six years. I hung everything up and took care of him, and nothing else mattered. I stayed with him until he passed away (in 1996), and then I moved away from the farm and started spending more time in Nashville, thinking that would help."

Did it help?

    "No. I think Jack White was the big help. He came in and kind of jerked me around a little bit, saying, 'You need to do this and this.' And I didnt want to let him down, and I kind of jumped right back in. When someone believes in you enough to set aside what theyre doing and help you, you want to come through for them.

The album you did with Jack, Van Lear Rose, was a Grammy winner in 2005, and you havent had an album since then. I understand youve been working in the studio this year, though.

    "Ive been recording with John Carter Cash, and we have enough recorded for three albums to come out: a religious album, an album of my greatest hits and an album of new stuff. But Im not through recording, and Im getting back into writing. Last year, I wrote a lot with Shawn Camp, who is one of the greatest writers in Nashville. Hes so good and country and wise."

Talented and country arent hard to come by around here. Wise, thats something else.

    "I think thats one of the doggone keys to everything, is being wise. If youre not wise a little bit, youre going to let everything pass you by. If you use your common sense, you get along a lot better. Im not putting down school, but common sense can be a lot better than being a college graduate."

Are they woman (or man) enough to take on Loretta Lynn?

Brad Wheeler

When theyre looking at her, theyre looking at country. On the new album Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn, a parade of star singers tip their 10-gallons to the sassy singer from Butcher Hollow.

Celebrating her 50 years as a recording artist, Loretta Lynn walks us through the new record, commenting on the dozen tracks that represent her broad influence and chart-topping career.

GMC Salutes Loretta Lynn

GMC Salutes Loretta Lynn's 50 Inspiring Years as a Recording Artist with Airing of Coal Miner's Daughter on Sunday, November 14
  GMC, America's favorite channel for uplifting music and family entertainment, will celebrate Loretta Lynn's 50 years as a recording artist with a special airing of the biopic film on her life, Coal Miner's Daughter, on Sunday, Nov. 14 at 7pm ET with an encore at 9:30 pm ET. The film chronicles Lynn's inspiring rise from an impoverished childhood in Kentucky to the pinnacle of the country/western music world.

The 1980 film garnered seven Oscar nominations, including one for Best Picture, and an Oscar win for Sissy Spacek as Best Actress for her portrayal of the country and western legend. Tommy Lee Jones also stars.

On Set with Sheryl Crow, Loretta Lynn & Miranda Lambert

Loretta Lynn & Miranda Lambert

Sheryl Crow went in to the studio for a very special tribute to a music icon.

ET is with the singer while she shoots a video for her new single that pairs her with country legend Loretta Lynn for the November 9 release of Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn.



"As a songwriter, she liberated us," Sheryl says of Loretta. "She gave us carte blanche to write about everything. She's the godmother of us all."

On a personal note, she gushed about getting to spend the day with one of her idols, saying, "It's an honor to be here and it's a blast! It's so much fun to hang out with her. The stories and how generous she is ... It's just wonderful."

The title track and first single, "Coal Miner's Daughter," features Loretta, Sheryl, and Miranda Lambert.

"I love both these women," Miranda tells ET. "They're huge influences to me, so I'm just like dang glad to be here. This is a good day."

Loretta chimes in on the love fest, saying, "I love these girls. I've known Sheryl for a long time in my life and when I first met her, I fell in love with her. I just thought she was great."

The album features an all-star group of artists personally chosen by Loretta to sing a dozen of her classic songs, including some of her award-winning duets with Conway Twitty.

Loretta Lynn talks with Chapter 16 about the reissue of her bestselling memoir fifty years after her first single hit the charts by Margaret Renkl UNCUT VERSION of Interview

Coal Miner's Daughter
By Loretta Lynn with George Vecsey
Vintage
240 pages
$15

Loretta Lynn was born in an Appalachian coal-mining community so far from the rhinestones of Nashville there wasn’t so much as a dirt road for getting down the mountain. People entered Butcher Holler, Kentucky, by way of a footpath, and they almost never left.

Loretta did, of course—an exit she credits to her late husband, Oliver Lynn (known to the world as “Doolittle” or “Doo”), whom she married at thirteen. Loretta was still a teenager when Doolittle bought her a guitar for their anniversary, telling her he liked the way she sang to their babies (four by the time Loretta was eighteen). Doolittle was also the one who took Loretta to her first honky tonk and talked the band into giving her a turn on stage.

But Loretta was the one who sang. And Loretta was the one who started writing the songs that spoke to so many women: poor, entirely at the mercy of their husbands, and covered up with babies. She has said she never considered herself part of the women’s movement. Nevertheless, when she sang, in her then-scandalous 1975 hit, “The Pill,” that birth control would let her trade her “old maternity dress” for “miniskirts, hotpants and a few little fancy frills,” her frankness about women’s changing roles had the force of truth
spoken to power.

By 1960, she had cut her first single, “I’m a Honky Tonk Girl,” leaving the kids with her mother and living in the car while she and Doo visited every country-music station they could get to, personally appealing to the disc jockeys to get the record played.

Fifty years later, Loretta Lynn has piled up an Appalachian mountain’s worth of milestones and honors. She has four Grammy awards, sixteen number-one singles, and fifty-one Top Ten hits to her credit, and in 1967 she became the Country Music Association’s first female Vocalist of the Year. In 1972 she hit another milestone, becoming the CMA’s first female Entertainer of the Year. In 1976, her memoir, Coal Miner’s Daughter, became a bestselling book; in 1980, Sissy Spacek’s Oscar-winning performance in the lead role introduced Loretta Lynn—and country music—to an audience far outside the reach of WSM Radio. Six years ago, Lynn recorded the critically acclaimed CD, Van Lear Rose, with rocker Jack White of the White Stripes, further expanding her reach and cementing her success as a music legend.

In person, she has the disarming habit of treating every person she talks to like a long-lost friend, even interviewers she's never met before. Loretta Lynn recently spoke by phone with Chapter 16 about the re-release of Coal Miner’s Daughter and about a new CD called Loretta Lynn: A Tribute to a Coal Miner’s Daughter, arriving November 9, that features today’s country stars—Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Carrie Underwood, Faith Hill, Martina McBride, among others—covering her groundbreaking work.

Chapter 16: A lot of people credit Coal Miner’s Daughter with bringing country music to a larger audience. When you sat down to write the book, did you have any inkling of the impact it would have?

Lynn: I had no idea that anyone would care whether I come from Kentucky, or whether I was born in Kentucky, or whether I was singing or not. I had no idea that anybody would care. I was really shocked when it become one of the bestselling books. It was just a plain little old common book. I didn’t think it amounted to that much, and here it was number one and stayed number one for quite a while.

Chapter 16: What do you think it is that people are responding to in your story?

"Miranda probably says it best. She says, 'Loretta knocked the doors down so we can go through.'”

Lynn: I think everybody is just about like me. We’re all alike. I think that’s what made it so big. Everybody’s doing the same thing. It wasn’t over nobody’s head. It just got down to the brass tacks. And I think that’s why it’s so big.

Chapter 16: So you still have people coming up to you with their dog-eared copies of the book and asking you to autograph it?

Lynn: Yes, honey: every night that I’m working. They’ll catch me when I get off the bus to go in; they’ll start holding them books up and shaking ‘em. And they have the second book, too. It’s really neat how country music fans are. When they’re with you, they’re with you. I kind of think that country-music fans are even more…they care more than anybody else.

Chapter 16: I just read your new introduction to the re-release of Coal Miner’s Daughter, and you explain that you hand-picked Sissy Spacek for the lead role in the movie.

Lynn: Sissy Spacek, she was the only one that I picked. And I thought that Levon Helm done a great job as my daddy—looked just like him. And you know I couldn’t watch the movie because of that. I seen it the one time, and now I try to dodge it because it brings back so many memories.

Chapter 16: It’s harder for you to watch the film than it was to write the book?

Lynn: Yeah, because it goes much deeper in bad things. I mean, we had nothing when we were growing up.

Chapter 16: Whose idea was it to write this book?

Lynn: I think mine. Believe it or not.

Chapter 16: So you wrote the song first and later realized there was much more left to tell?

Lynn: Right. Because the [recorded version of the song] was only six verses, and I had six verses more. And Owen Bradley says, “Loretta, get in the other room there and take six verses off of that song. There’s already been one ‘El Paso,’ and they’ll never be another one.” And I don’t know what “El Paso” had to do with it, but I imagine it had a lot more verses to it, don’t you? I thought maybe I’d try to listen to that song once I get aholt of it. I don’t know how to get “El Paso” unless you get the Best of Marty Robbins, because he’s the one that had it out.

Chapter 16: Have you ever recorded the longer version of the song?

Lynn: No, I haven’t. I took ‘em off. I don’t know what I did with the six verses, and I can’t find ‘em. I thought I’d go back in and I’ll re-cut this thing. I guess I could go ahead and write six more verses. It won’t be hard to do. But I don’t remember exactly how they went. I remember some of it, but not much.

Chapter 16: You mentioned how hard it is for you to watch the movie. How hard was it to write the book?

Lynn: There would be days it would bother me. It would be according to what we were talking about that day. You know me and Sissy kind of hung together for a year. I kind of stayed with her and made sure that everything was pretty well done like it was supposed to be. I think Sissy had a hard time too because there’d be days where she’d start to cry, and they’d call me on the road and say, “We’re having a hard time with Sissy today. She’s been crying all day, can you call her?” And I would call her. I don’t get to see her much anymore because she’s so busy you know. She come down one day last year, and we did pictures all day long for something that she was doing. I love Sissy, and she knows she can call on me at any time. And I can call on her any time. It’s just one of them things.

Chapter 16: She did an absolutely unbelievable job.

Lynn: She did. She really did. And it really bothered her when she’d start to…. She knew a lot of the stories that went deeper. I think that’s why she’d start to cry. She’d start to remember what we were talking about.

Chapter 16: You’ve written now two memoirs and almost countless songs. Is there a difference between writing a song and writing a life story?

Lynn: Yes, ‘cause the life story you pretty well have to hang to the truth. I mean you don’t want to overdo it or under-do it because it’ll be too emotional if you overdo it, and then if you under-do it you’re not going to get that emotion that you need. It’s kind of hard when you’re writing the truth down. If you’re just making things up, I mean, who cares?

Chapter 16: So your songs are primarily made up?

Lynn: With every song I’ve ever written, there’s a part of me in it. Of course, I’m not going to say what all they were ‘cause it would be hard to even do that, but I know there’s a part of me in every song I’ve wrote, if it’s just half a line.

Chapter 16: In the new introduction to Coal Miner’s Daughter, you mention that you have a writing room beside your house. Could you describe that for me?

Lynn: Tim Cobb kind of set it up. He’s the one that makes all my gowns and stuff. He tries to do stuff like that to help me out, and he fixed up the little writing room ‘cause he knew that I like to go out there and write. I can’t write around anybody. It has to be whoever I’m writing with or be by myself. So he set up the writing room, and Sheryl [Crow] used the writing room the whole time she was here. And Miranda [Lambert] had her bus, so we all three had a place to run to when we got tired of each other. They did “Coal Miner’s Daughter” with me––on the new album.

Chapter 16: Is your writing room a separate little cabin?

Lynn: Yeah, it’s two rooms. They’re pretty big rooms, and it’s a separate thing from the house, so that’s good too.

Chapter 16: Does it have a computer, or do you still write by hand?

Lynn: All by hand. Little Shawn Camp, he writes with me a lot, and he just called a while ago. Left a message: “Hey, Loretta. It’s about time you called me, you know. We need to get back into writing.” So I’ve got to give him a call and tell him to “get back over here, then, if we’re gonna write.”

Chapter 16: Are you working on new songs right now?

"I had no idea that anybody would care. I was really shocked when it become one of the bestselling books. It was just a plain little old common book. I didn’t think it amounted to that much, and here it was number one and stayed number one for quite a while."

Lynn: Yeah, I’m working on new songs, and that’s what I’m wanting to do—some more new stuff. I’ve got a religious album, and I’m working on a Christmas album. So me and Shawn need to finish up some of the Christmas songs to get them down.

Chapter 16: In Coal Miner’s Daughter, you write that you would sometimes check into a hotel, even when you were back in town, because it was so hard to come home for only a day or two between road trips.

Lynn: Used to, I might be working three weeks and home one day. And this went on for forty years. And people say, “Why are you working so hard?” Well, I worked hard because I had to. I had a big family, and my husband was a mechanic. He didn’t make enough money doing mechanic work to pay the rent, let alone anything else. So it was rough for us. Yeah, I tried to do everything I could to make it better for the family.

Chapter 16: How big is your family now?

Lynn: Twenty-one grandkids. I think there’s two or three great-grandkids. I’m not sure, but there might be a couple. I don’t want to even talk about it. Then I’d have ‘em all here to dinner tomorrow. And that happens, too.

Chapter 16: They all live nearby?

Lynn: Yeah. And you know it’s funny because most of them sing. Tayla Lynn, my little granddaughter, she sings. She’s on the road with a couple other girls [as part of the country trio Stealing Angels].

Chapter 16: I wanted to talk to you a little bit about how things have changed in the business and in town. When you came to Nashville in 1961, your first single, “Honky Tonk Girl,” was already on the charts. Do you think a song like that—or a singer like you—would have the same reception today?

Lynn: I think so. There’s not that much going on out there to this day.

Chapter 16: It’s universal.

Lynn: I think so. Country music gets out a lot better now because of TV. They have the MTV thing, and that helped.

Chapter 16: You’re talking about Country Music Television?

Lynn: Yeah, that helped a lot. But there’s another one [GAC] that plays country music all day long and they’re doing a great job, I think.

Chapter 16: What’s the biggest difference between Nashville now and Nashville when you got here?

Lynn: Well, it’s more open to country music now than it was. It was kind of like a hush-hush thing when I come to Nashville. I couldn’t believe it. They wasn’t no country music hardly at all being played. The Opry was being played; Patsy [Cline] was being played, but Patsy was never real country, and there were very few [others being played on the radio.] Jim Reeves was one of the guys, and Sonny James—I worked with both of them. When we first started, I was in there with ‘em. Jim Reeves borrowed my guitar for one of the shows one day. His got busted. He was doing a movie, and his guitar got busted so he borrowed mine. Doolittle was traveling with me at the time, and he looked over at Doo, and he said, “Doo, why don’t you buy that girl a guit-tar.” He couldn’t keep it tuned; he couldn’t hardly sing with it, so I thought it was funny.

Chapter 16: Did you get a new guitar?

Lynn: Well, I got a new one later on, but not right then. We had to wait till we got enough money to do that.

Chapter 16: You really started your own success by visiting radio stations in person.

Lynn: Radio stations and radio stations. And today, I still talk to [the DJs] on the phone. And if I’m in the town and I’ve got the time, I stop and see ‘em now.

Chapter 16: I’ve heard Taylor Swift started in a similar way, going door to door on Music Row.

Lynn: Oh, did she?

Chapter 16: Do you see yourself in any of the young female country artists today?

Lynn: Miranda [Lambert] reminds me a lot of me. She probably reminds me of me because she likes the honky-tonk songs, and you can’t go wrong with a honky-tonk song.

Chapter 16: She’s on your new record.

Lynn: Yeah, she is. The day that they come down here to work with me, all day long we were so busy recording “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” all three of us; that was quite a lot of work. I ended up working till about nine o’clock that night. We put in a hard day’s work that day.

Chapter 16: And you didn’t have a chance to just chat about what the business is like for them and whether it’s any different from your own experience as a young artist?

Lynn: We never had a chance to do any chatting. I think all three of us knew what the other one was thinking, and they knew that I loved ‘em for what they were doing. I appreciated that so much. And Kid Rock did that [“I Know How”]: “Yeah, I love her/ like she wants me to/ and I know how.…” I cut that, and I cut it real slow and bluesy. Boy, he moved in there and he… [sings] “Yeah, I love her like she wants me to.” I mean, he rocked. It’s great. He did it the other night on that Grammy show. I just thought it was great.

Chapter 16: The songs on this record are so associated with you—not with just your singing voice, but also with your life. Is it odd to hear other people covering your songs?

Lynn: Oh, it tickles me to death. I don’t think it’s odd ‘cause I cut people’s songs all my life. I just think it’s such a great thing that they cared enough for me to do this. You know, I never thought people cared about me being in the business almost fifty years now. And so I just thought it was fantastic that they cared enough that they even helped me out. That just shows you the country artists. It shows you the difference [between] the country artist and the rest. I think.

Chapter 16: I just re-read Coal Miner’s Daughter, and one thing you don’t really spend a lot of time on is how some of your songs—like “The Pill” and “One on the Way”—were considered controversial. Some of them were even banned from the radio.

Lynn: I didn’t do it to be controversial. I was just cutting about real life, and they banned them at the stations, you know? And I thought, “Why in the world are they banning them? It’s going on all the time.” I never could understand why they’d do that. But every time they banned one, it went number one for me. I didn’t really have to get out and spend any money or work with it. They still record my songs. So I’m just so thankful. Kid Rock, he sang [“I Know How”] the other night [at the Grammy Salute to Country Music]. Was you at the show?

Chapter 16: No; I’m sorry I wasn’t.

Lynn: Well, what happened, Margaret? You should have hollered, and I could have taken you in.

Chapter 16: I wish you had. That would have been a highlight of my life.

Lynn: If you’d’a come out to the bus—I got ready in the bus and everything.

Chapter 16: Next time I’ll try.

Lynn: OK. And when we do shows down here, come down, too. It won’t cost you a thing; you just holler for me. Just say, “Loretta told me to come,” and that’s that.

Chapter 16: I’ll look forward to that. I was just thinking about that song Kid Rock sang the other night: when you first recorded that song, did you ever consider yourself a little bit ahead of your time?

"Life’s life, and everybody lives it the same way. Some of them have a little more money than others; so what? I don’t care if you’ve got money or if you’re poor, you’re going to go through life about the same way."

Lynn: I thought, “It’s weird that they’re banning them because everybody’s living this.” I was writing about my life, and everybody around me was living about the same way. I never could understand why they’d do that. I guess it was because they were a little bit… like they didn’t want nobody else to know. That’s ridiculous. Life’s life, and everybody lives it the same way. Some of them have a little more money than others; so what? Everybody has to live the same way. I don’t care if you’ve got money or if you’re poor, you’re going to go through life about the same way.

Chapter 16: Do you think it’s easier or harder today for a country artist to sing about controversial topics?

Lynn: Oh, it’s easier. Oh, yes. Because this was fifty years ago that I was doing it, and I think maybe I knocked down a few of the doors. Miranda probably says it best. She says, “Loretta knocked the doors down so we can go through.”

Chapter 16: Better than just opening the doors—just flat-out blowing them off the hinges.

Lynn: It’s true. Where do you live, Margaret? Are you in Nashville?

Chapter 16: I am. I’m right here in Nashville.

Lynn: Well, great. Then it won’t be no big deal for us to get together.

Chapter 16: I was hoping your publicists would let me come out there for this conversation, but I understand that you’re just really, really busy.

Lynn: Hey, I didn’t know that.

Chapter 16: They’re protecting you, and that’s their job.

Lynn: Well, protecting me from what?

Chapter 16: Being over-committed.

Lynn: Well, [my daughter] Patsy worries about it, and I told her, “Patsy, I’m used to working. I’ve done it all my life; I’ve worked hard––and I’d rather work than not work.”

Chapter 16: You’ve written so many songs about strong women and women who are able to take a hard situation and somehow come out on top, and yet were never associated with the women’s movement.

Lynn: Well, I never had time really. When all this was going down, I was writing about it, but I never really got to live the way that…. Like “The Pill”: you’ve taken it, and you know that other women are taking it, so why make a big deal out of it? And “One’s On the Way”—how many have one on the way? It’s just no big deal, and that’s the way I felt when we was recording them. And when they’d hit the stations, “Well, oh my. One’s on the way, it’s gotta be dirty.” That’s just what their thinking was.

Chapter 16: I’m wondering if one of the reasons you didn’t necessarily consider yourself a feminist or part of that crowd is because your songs were doing all that talking for you.

Lynn: Yeah, I was living through my songs, too. That’s why they were hits. Every woman was living through them songs. And I’ve had ‘em holler out in the middle of my show and tell me all about their life. And sometimes [they] just stand up and start telling about their life. And that’s neat. I think it’s more personal because I would meet ‘em, and we’d talk about the way we had to be living. And not all songs do that.

Chapter 16: You mention in the new introduction to Coal Miner’s Daughter that you don’t even think of them as your fans; you think of them as your friends. Maybe they think of you as their friend, too.

Lynn: Most of ‘em are, and I can have conversations with ‘em, no matter if they just come out one time to see me. As long as they know what I’ve been doing and they’ve been buying the records––well, we know each other. I don’t know their personal lives like they do mine, but I feel like we’re close because we’re talking about people that’s living life. And we’re all the same; we ain’t no different.

Chapter 16: Is there a song you’ve written that you wish somebody would cover because it didn’t get quite the attention you thought it might or hoped it would?

Lynn: I can’t think of one right off the top of my head. If I think of one, I’ll call you back. This is awful, ain’t it?

Chapter 16: I think it’s a good sign! Your last album, Van Lear Rose, was a huge hit with critics.

Lynn: Jack White did that.

Chapter 16: Do you think you’ll work with him again?

Lynn: I think so. I love Jack White. The first time I ever met Jack, my manager, Nancy [Russell], brought him down. I don’t know if you know Nancy or not.

Chapter 16: I don’t.

Lynn: She lives in Nashville. And she’s Alan Jackson’s manager, too. She’s really a sweet person. And she brought Jack down. That’s how we met.

Chapter 16: Do you think his involvement with the project brought your work to the attention of a different audience?

Lynn: I think so, because Jack was a rock and roller. And everywhere I go there’s people there that knew Jack White that bought the album but never bought an album of mine. And I think that helped me a lot. I think Jack White was good for me.

Chapter 16: I think you were good for Jack White, too.

Lynn: Well, we try. We try.

Chapter 16: You’ve written another memoir, Still Woman Enough, and in the new introduction to Coal Miner’s Daughter, you hint that there might be another film. Is that in the works?

Lynn: I think if I want it to be. I think if I work hard and want it…really work at it. I wouldn’t want to just go in and slam one down and say, “Hey, this is another film.” I’d want it to be a hit, just like Coal Miner’s Daughter.

Chapter 16: I was thinking about you during all this excitement in the news about the miners down in South America.

Lynn: It breaks my heart when I hear stuff like that.

Chapter 16: When you hear about these things on the news, does it take you back home?

Lynn: It takes me right back to seeing Daddy come out of the coal mine, just covered with coal dust. And then they’d stop and they’d take a bath—they had bath houses for the miners—and it just took me right back to seeing Daddy come out of the mines. And Daddy would jump me for being around where I could see him because he’d say, “You know it might not be me that comes up out of that mine; it might be somebody that you wouldn’t want to be around.” And daddy would jump me. But I never was afraid. I guess it was a good thing that I wasn’t afraid because I don’t think there was any miners that would hurt me anyway. Because they were all like Daddy. Yeah, the coal miner’s daughter remembers a lot.

Chapter 16: Is there anything I didn’t ask you that you’d like to talk about?

Lynn: I wished you hadn’t-a asked me that. Well, I’ll tell you, you can call me, or you can call Tim, either one. Tim will be happy to help you, too. What we can’t think of right now and you want to know about it, you just call back. Of course, Tim [Cobb], we’re so close, him doing my clothes, my gowns and everything. He has for twenty five years—maybe longer.

Chapter 16: It’s a blessing to have somebody like that—somebody you can trust.

Lynn: It really is. This is the main thing. Somebody that you can trust and you know ain’t gonna hurt you in any way. That’s almost unheard of.

Lynn: Anytime you want to call me, just pick up the phone.

Chapter 16: I will.

Lynn: You know my number.

Chapter 16: I do.

Lynn: Okay, honey.

Chapter 16: Thank you so much.

Lynn: Well, I love you. Bye, bye.

Still Proud to Be a Coal Miner's Daughter

Loretta Lynn talks about her reissued memoir and her new tribute CD on the 50th anniversary of her first single 

Loretta Lynn was born in an Appalachian coal-mining community so far from the rhinestones of Nashville there wasn't so much as a dirt road for getting down the mountain. People entered Butcher Holler, Ky., by way of a footpath, and they almost never left.

Lynn did, of course — an exit she credits to her late husband, Oliver Lynn (known to the world as "Doolittle" or "Doo"), whom she married at 13. Loretta was still a teenager when Doolittle bought her a guitar for their anniversary, telling her he liked the way she sang to their babies (four by the time Loretta was 18). Doolittle was also the one who took Loretta to her first honky-tonk and talked the band into giving her a turn onstage.

But Loretta was the one who sang. And Loretta was the one who started writing the songs that spoke to so many women: poor, entirely at the mercy of their husbands, and covered up with babies. She has said she never considered herself part of the women's movement. Nevertheless, when she sang, in her then-scandalous 1975 hit "The Pill," that birth control would let her trade her "old maternity dress" for "miniskirts, hotpants and a few little fancy frills," her frankness about women's changing roles had the force of truth spoken to power.

In 1960, she cut her first single, "I'm a Honky Tonk Girl." She left the kids with her mother and lived in the car, while she and Doo visited every country station they could reach. They appealed in person to disc jockeys to get the record played.

Fifty years later, Loretta Lynn has piled up an Appalachian mountain's worth of milestones and honors. She has four Grammy awards, 16 No. 1 singles, and 51 Top 10 hits to her credit, and in 1967 she became the Country Music Association's first female Vocalist of the Year. In 1972 she set another milestone, becoming the CMA's first female Entertainer of the Year.

In 1976, she released her best-selling memoir, Coal Miner's Daughter. That led to the 1980 film version, and Sissy Spacek's Oscar-winning performance in the lead role introduced Loretta Lynn — and country music — to an audience far beyond WSM Radio. Six years ago, Lynn recorded the critically acclaimed CD Van Lear Rose with rocker Jack White of the White Stripes, further extending her reach and cementing her success as a music legend.

In person, she has the disarming habit of treating every person she talks to as a long-lost friend, even interviewers she's never met before. Loretta Lynn recently spoke by phone about the re-release of the Coal Miner's Daughter book and about a new CD called Loretta Lynn: A Tribute to a Coal Miner's Daughter, arriving Nov. 9, that features today's country stars — Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Carrie Underwood, Faith Hill, Martina McBride, among others — covering her groundbreaking work.

Q. A lot of people credit Coal Miner's Daughter with bringing country music to a larger audience. When you sat down to write the book, did you have any inkling of the impact it would have?

Loretta Lynn: I had no idea that anyone would care whether I come from Kentucky, or whether I was born in Kentucky, or whether I was singing or not. I had no idea that anybody would care. I was really shocked when it become one of the bestselling books. It was just a plain little old common book. I didn't think it amounted to that much, and here it was No. 1 and stayed No. 1 for quite a while.

Q. I just read your new introduction to the re-release of Coal Miner's Daughter, and you explain that you hand-picked Sissy Spacek for the movie.

Sissy Spacek, she was the only one that I picked. And I thought that Levon Helm done a great job as my daddy — looked just like him. And you know I couldn't watch the movie because of that. I seen it the one time, and now I try to dodge it because it brings back so many memories.

Q. It's harder for you to watch the film than it was to write the book?

Yeah, because it goes much deeper in bad things. I mean, we had nothing when we were growing up.

Q. Whose idea was it to write this book?

I think mine. Believe it or not.

Q. How hard was it to write?

There would be days it would bother me. It would be according to what we were talking about that day. You know me and Sissy kind of hung together for a year. I kind of stayed with her and made sure that everything was pretty well done like it was supposed to be. I think Sissy had a hard time too because there'd be days where she'd start to cry, and they'd call me on the road and say, "We're having a hard time with Sissy today. She's been crying all day, can you call her?" And I would call her. I don't get to see her much anymore because she's so busy, you know. She come down one day last year, and we did pictures all day long for something that she was doing. I love Sissy, and she knows she can call on me at any time. And I can call on her any time. It's just one of them things.

Q. She did an absolutely unbelievable job.

She did. She really did. And it really bothered her when she'd start to ... she knew a lot of the stories that went deeper. I think that's why she'd start to cry. She'd start to remember what we were talking about.

Q. You've written now two memoirs and almost countless songs. Is there a difference between writing a song and writing a life story?

Yes, 'cause the life story you pretty well have to hang to the truth. I mean you don't want to overdo it or under-do it because it'll be too emotional if you overdo it, and then if you underdo it you're not going to get that emotion that you need. It's kind of hard when you're writing the truth down. If you're just making things up, I mean, who cares?

Q. So your songs are primarily made up?

With every song I've ever written, there's a part of me in it. Of course, I'm not going to say what all they were 'cause it would be hard to even do that, but I know there's a part of me in every song I've wrote, if it's just half a line.

Q. In the new introduction to Coal Miner's Daughter, you mention that you have a little writing room beside your house. Could you describe that for me?

Tim Cobb kind of set it up. He's the one that makes all my gowns and stuff. He tries to do stuff like that to help me out, and he fixed up the little writing room 'cause he knew that I like to go out there and write. I can't write around anybody. It has to be whoever I'm writing with or be by myself. So he set up the writing room, and Sheryl [Crow] used the writing room the whole time she was here. And Miranda [Lambert] had her bus, so we all three had a place to run to when we got tired of each other. They did "Coal Miner's Daughter" with me — on the new album.

Q. In Coal Miner's Daughter, you write that you would sometimes check into a hotel, even when you were back in town, because it was so hard to come home for only a day or two between road trips.

Used to, I might be working three weeks and home one day. And this went on for 40 years. And people say, "Why are you working so hard?" Well, I worked hard because I had to. I had a big family, and my husband was a mechanic. He didn't make enough money doing mechanic work to pay the rent, let alone anything else. So it was rough for us. Yeah, I tried to do everything I could to make it better for the family.

Q. What's the biggest difference between Nashville now and Nashville when you got here?

Well, it's more open to country music now than it was. It was kind of like a hush-hush thing when I come to Nashville. I couldn't believe it. They wasn't no country music hardly at all being played. The Opry was being played; Patsy [Cline] was being played, but Patsy was never real country, and there were very few [others being played on the radio]. Jim Reeves was one of the guys, and Sonny James — I worked with both of them. When we first started, I was in there with 'em. Jim Reeves borrowed my guitar for one of the shows one day. His got busted. He was doing a movie, and his guitar got busted so he borrowed mine. Doolittle was traveling with me at the time, and he looked over at Doo, and he said, "Doo, why don't you buy that girl a guit-tar." He couldn't keep it tuned; he couldn't hardly sing with it, so I thought it was funny.

Q. You really started your own success by visiting radio stations in person.

Radio stations and radio stations. And today, I still talk to [the DJs] on the phone. And if I'm in the town and I've got the time, I stop and see 'em now.

Q. Do you see yourself in any of the young female country artists today?

Miranda [Lambert] reminds me a lot of me. She probably reminds me of me because she likes the honky-tonk songs, and you can't go wrong with a honky-tonk song.

Q. She's on your new record.

Yeah, she is. The day that they come down here to work with me, all day long we were so busy recording "Coal Miner's Daughter," all three of us; that was quite a lot of work. I ended up working till about 9 o'clock that night. We put in a hard day's work that day.

Q. The songs on this record are so associated with you — not with just your singing voice, but also with your life. Is it odd to hear other people covering your songs?

Oh, it tickles me to death. I don't think it's odd 'cause I cut people's songs all my life. I just think it's such a great thing that they cared enough for me to do this. You know, I never thought people cared about me being in the business almost 50 years now. And so I just thought it was fantastic that they cared enough that they even helped me out. That just shows you the country artists. It shows you the difference [between] the country artist and the rest. I think.

Q. I just re-read Coal Miner's Daughter, and one thing you don't really spend a lot of time on is how some of your songs — like "The Pill" and "One on the Way" — were considered controversial. Some of them were even banned from the radio.

I didn't do it to be controversial. I was just cutting about real life, and they banned them at the stations, you know? And I thought, "Why in the world are they banning them? It's going on all the time." I never could understand why they'd do that. But every time they banned one, it went No. 1 for me. I didn't really have to get out and spend any money or work with it. They still record my songs. So I'm just so thankful. Kid Rock, he sang ["I Know How"] the other night [at the Grammy Salute to Country Music]. Was you at the show?

Q. No, I'm sorry I wasn't.

Well, what happened, Margaret? You should have hollered, and I could have taken you in.

Q. I wish you had. That would have been a highlight of my life.

If you'd'a come out to the bus — I got ready in the bus and everything.

Q. Next time I'll try.

OK. And when we do shows down here, come down, too. It won't cost you a thing; you just holler for me. Just say, "Loretta told me to come," and that's that.

Q. I'll look forward to that. Thinking about that song Kid Rock sang the other night: When you first recorded that song, did you ever consider yourself a little bit ahead of your time?

I thought, "It's weird that they're banning them because everybody's living this." I was writing about my life, and everybody around me was living about the same way. I never could understand why they'd do that. I guess it was because they were a little bit ... like they didn't want nobody else to know. That's ridiculous. Life's life, and everybody lives it the same way. Some of them have a little more money than others; so what? Everybody has to live the same way. I don't care if you've got money or if you're poor, you're going to go through life about the same way.

Q. Do you think it's easier or harder today for a country artist to sing about controversial topics?

Oh, it's easier. Oh, yes. Because this was 50 years ago that I was doing it, and I think maybe I knocked down a few of the doors. Miranda probably says it best. She says, "Loretta knocked the doors down so we can go through."

Q. You've written so many songs about strong women and women who are able to take a hard situation and somehow come out on top, and yet were never associated with the women's movement.

Well, I never had time really. When all this was going down, I was writing about it, but I never really got to live the way that. ... Like "The Pill," you've taken it, and you know that other women are taking it, so why make a big deal out of it? And "One's On the Way" — how many have one on the way? It's just no big deal, and that's the way I felt when we was recording them. And when they'd hit the stations, "Well, oh my. One's on the way, it's gotta be dirty." That's just what their thinking was.

Q. I'm wondering if one of the reasons you didn't necessarily consider yourself a feminist or part of that crowd is because your songs were doing all that talking for you.

Yeah, I was living through my songs, too. That's why they were hits. Every woman was living through them songs. And I've had 'em holler out in the middle of my show and tell me all about their life. And sometimes [they] just stand up and start telling about their life. And that's neat. I think it's more personal because I would meet 'em, and we'd talk about the way we had to be living. And not all songs do that.

Q. I was thinking about you during all this excitement in the news about the miners down in South America.

It breaks my heart when I hear stuff like that.

Q. When you hear about these things on the news, does it take you back home?

It takes me right back to seeing Daddy come out of the coal mine, just covered with coal dust. And then they'd stop and they'd take a bath — they had bath houses for the miners — and it just took me right back to seeing Daddy come out of the mines. And Daddy would jump me for being around where I could see him because he'd say, "You know it might not be me that comes up out of that mine; it might be somebody that you wouldn't want to be around." And daddy would jump me. But I never was afraid. I guess it was a good thing that I wasn't afraid because I don't think there was any miners that would hurt me anyway. Because they were all like Daddy. Yeah, the coal miner's daughter remembers a lot.




LORETTA LYNN QUEEN OF COUNTRYon the Cover of Country Weekly

Loretta Lynn celebrates her 50th year as a country music star with an all-star party, a new tribute album and a special Grammy salute. In this cover story, Loretta talks about her career, health, songwriting and the new album, which features Miranda Lambert, Alan Jackson, Martina McBride and many other artists. I couldnt believe that so many wanted to sing on it, she humbly declares. Loretta also adds that she feels healthy and ready to work. I still want to sing, she says. If I can still sing, thats what Ill do.

To learn more, pick up the November 8, 2010 issue of Country Weekly, on newsstands now.

Kid Rock talks about LORETTA

Billboard 2010:
You're in town for the Loretta Lynn tribute. What do you respect about her?

 
She's genuine. When you talk to her, that's Loretta Lynn, that's not anybody else, it wasn't manufactured. I believe her. She's the truth.
 
Did she ask you to be on the new record, "Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn"?(On it, Rock re-imagines Lynn 's "I Know How.")
 
She did, she sent me a nice little letter. I thought, "who's sending me a letter in a pink envelope with two big Ls on the front?" She said she liked "All Summer Long," asked me if I'd do the thing, and I said of course. I started listening to her boxed set, revisiting some of the stuff, and I thought I'd really like to do a bluesy take on "I Know How." And she got back to me, said, "that's crazy, that was Johnny Cash's favorite song of mine, nobody knew that."
Yours sounds a little different from her version.
 
I had to do it my own way, I can't be Loretta Lynn. Sheryl Crow called me and said, "you gotta hear the story Loretta's telling me right now." I guess when [Lynn] heard it, she did some big hillbilly dance up and down her bus, screamin' "Kid Rock's my boyfriend, I love this." I did a more Memphis soul/Motown take on it.
 

Tribute cd preview LINK TO HEAR THE SONGS

TRIBUTE CD PREVIEW LINK  TO HEAR THE SONGS
Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn is in stores November 9th and celebrates Loretta Lynns 50 years in the music business. The album features stars hand-picked by Loretta to re-record some of her biggest hits, including Faith Hill, Kid Rock, Reba McEntire, Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, and more!
http://wycd.radio.com/2010/10/21/coal-miners-daughter-a-tribute-to-loretta-lynn/

Loretta Lynn, Taylor Swift and the Secret Sisters

What Will Heightened Expectations Do to/for Women Artists?

Sheryl Crow, Miranda Lambert honor Loretta Lynn at CMAs

Sheryl Crow and Miranda Lambert will perform Loretta Lynn's "Coal Miner's Daughter" during the CMA Awards on Wednesday, Nov. 10.

Crow and Lambert sing the song with Lynn on Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn, which is due out on Nov. 9 on Columbia Nashville. That album also features contributions from the White Stripes, Kid Rock, Steve Earle, Allison Moorer, Faith Hill, Paramore and many others.

The CMA Awards will be broadcast live on ABC, beginning at 7 p.m. Central. Lambert has 10 nominations for the show, including nods in the entertainer, album and song categories.

Week 44: Loretta Lynn, Coal Miners Daughter

by Nathan Rabin

A.V. Club head writer and hip-hop specialist Nathan Rabin recently decided to spend a year or two immersing himself in the canon of country music, a genre he knew little about, but was keen to explore. The result: Nashville Or Bust, a series of essays about seminal country artists. After 52 entries, Rabin plans to travel south and explore some of country musics most hallowed landmarks and institutions.

At a crucial moment in Coal Miners Daughter, the Oscar-winning 1980 Loretta Lynn biopic, Lynn (played indelibly by Sissy Spacek) is more or less pushed onstage for the first time at a smoky honky-tonk by her glad-handing husband and soon-to-be-manager Doo (Tommy Lee Jones). The singer is at first understandably overwhelmed. She begins unsteadily. Her voice is a little shaky and her guitar playing unsteady. Shes a little spooked by the lights. But as the song progresses she becomes increasingly confident and by the end, the entire audience is beaming with admiration. She may have gone onstage that night a timid, nave, unknown Kentucky housewife who first picked up a guitar at 24, but she left it a star! 

Variations on this scene can be found in countless musical biographies. Its incredibly satisfying as drama and as confirmation of pop mythology. We need to believe that stardom can happen that effortlessly so the star machine can continue to chew people up and spit them out. We need these rags-to-riches fantasies to keep us from viewing the star-making process as inherently cruel, even random. 

Coal Miners Daughter is adapted from Lynns autobiography, so its entirely possible that Lynns first public performance played out exactly as it does in the film. But a little formulaic Hollywood magic also went a long way toward making a rather grim drama about the daughter of a desperately poor coal miner ascending to stardom and dealing with her troubled marriage a feasible commercial prospect. The biopic hit screens at a fortuitous time. The films massive, iconic success, along with the equally massive success of Urban Cowboy, exposed country music to audiences who otherwise might have dismissed it. Before 1980, it was relatively easy for audiences to pretend country didnt exist or at the very least represented a marginal genre. It could be written off as a hick preoccupation, a Southern thing. 

But Coal Miners Daughter and Urban Cowboy pushed country defiantly into the mainstream. It could no longer be dismissed as a musical inbred cousin to be kept locked in a basement. (In Milwaukee, Coal Miners Daughter became the favorite movie of my 5-year-old older sister, though at that point it didnt have a whole lot of competition.) The events chronicled in Coal Miners Daughter were old news to country fans, but the film canonized Lynns life and career for the rest of the world. It became her defining narrative even if it ends on an abrupt note that conveys, indirectly, that its subjects story was far from over. Thirty years later, the 78-year-old icons dramatic journey from poverty to fame remains far from over. 

Coal Miners Daughter focuses primarily on Lynns relationship with her husband/manager Oliver Doo Lynn. Even for a figure as fiery and strong-willed as Lynn, in the 50s, 60s, and early 70s, the world of a female country singer was by default the domestic realm. Lynn consequently alternated between being a Kitty Wells-like protector of the family and conventional moralityCoal Miners Daughter tellingly shows Lynn singing along to Wells signature hit It Wasnt God Who Made Honky Tonk Angelsand an aggressive creature wrestling with the changes that came with the sexual revolution and feminism. 

Most notably, Lynn released The Pill in 1975, a tongue-in-cheek celebration of a pharmaceutical wonder that offered hope and freedom to women whose options were otherwise limited by circumstance, fate, and the myriad failings of the rhythm method. It was also, not coincidentally, a celebration not just of liberation but also of no-strings-attached sex divorced from marriage, commitment, and childhood. Lynn had the chutzpah to act as if that might be a good thing, when we all know that eyes-closed missionary sex solely for the purpose of procreation is the only acceptable form of intercourse as far as Baby Jesus is concerned. 

On Rated X, Lynn offers a scathing take on sexual double standards that time has rendered as quaint and old-fashioned as a Dave Berg The Lighter Side cartoon but must have seemed very progressive and even shocking at the time. The Rated X of the title refers not to Deep Throat or The Devil In Miss Jones but to a divorced woman who is considered damaged goods by a society still uptight enough to be scandalized by divorce. Like Harper Valley PTA, Rated X confronts the hypocrisy of judgmental busybodies who project their own perverted thoughts and moral failings onto a convenient scapegoat. 

Lynns penchant for courting controversy wasnt limited to sex. On 1966s Dear Uncle Sam, Lynn sings from the perspective of a patriot trying to reconcile her fierce, protective love for a partner sent to die in Vietnam with her innate understanding that war is sometimes inevitable and justified. Its not exactly a bomb-throwing manifesto, but it is a heartfelt, heartrending exploration of the human costs of warfare that Lynn slipped back into her set lists during the Iraq War. 

Lynn grappled with the most important social issues facing our nation, but she did not hesitate to beat a bitch down when the situation called for it. In song and life, Lynn could be a fierce lioness when it came to fighting for her man. As chronicled in Coal Miners Daughter, she had her hands full trying to tame a hard-drinking womanizer who felt threatened by his wifes incredible success. On Fist City, for example, Lynn deliciously taunts a silly little thing whose interest in Lynns husband is destined to earn her a one-way invitation to a beatdown. 

Fist City is the single greatest song title of all time. Ive been dying to get in a fistfight just so I can say something along the lines of, You keep dogging me and youre going to earn a one-way Greyhound ticket to Fist City, population: your sorry ass. Im just disappointed that Lynn didnt record it 20 years later so it could accompany a music video of her beating down a series of trollops with designs on her husband.

The man I love when he picks up trash
He puts it in a garbage can
Thats what you look like to me 
And what I sees a pity
You better close your face and stay out of my way 
If you dont want to go to fist city

Lynn taunts with Southern-fried sass. Somebody better get out the pooper-scooper cause Lynn is talking mad shit. 

Lynn makes it apparent that Fist City is not a place anyone would want to visit, but in the decades since the songs release, Fist City has undergone a renaissance. It now has world-class food, glittering new hotels, and even a Major League Baseball team. Yes, Fist City is no longer the exclusive domain of trifling women of ill repute trying to steal Loretta Lynns man. 

The price of love is eternal vigilance. In the songs of Honky Tonk Girl: The Loretta Lynn Collection, Lynn is constantly battling women out to steal her man, men out to score a little tail on the side, no-good men who need to be put in their place, and smooth-talking lotharios who think shell surrender her lady virtue without a fight. Lynn addresses these matters of the heart with a gloriously light touch and indefatigable sense of humor. Take Happy Birthday for example. Underneath the painfully bland title lies a sneaky little kiss-off from a wronged woman who preemptively wishes a cheating partner a happy birthday, a Merry Christmas, and a happy New Year because she sure as shit isnt sticking around to get cheated on all year-round. 

Lynn wasnt one to passively stand by her man. On songs like Your Squaw Is On The Warpath, Dont Come Home A Drinkin (With Lovin On Your Mind), and a lively cover of These Boots Are Made For Walking Lynn happily puts arrogant men in their place. 

Loretta Lynn, Your Squaw Is On The WarpathJust as Wynette had George Jones and Dolly Parton had Porter Wagoner, Lynn was able to act out the battle of the sexes in song after song with regular duet partner Conway Twitty, who joined forces with Lynn for a number of collaborative albums and singles. Twitty and Lynns collaborations sometimes pushed the romantic melodrama of Lynns solo work to kitschy, gothic extremes. On The Letter, for example, Twitty, with a spoken-word assist from Lynn, tremblingly recounts encountering an ex-girlfriend so concerned that her boyfriend is cheating on her that she asks Twitty to write a letter professing his undying love for her to make her current boyfriend jealous. Itd be a romantic potboiler of a song even without the climactic reveal that Twitty doesnt have to pretend to still be in love with his ex, since he never stopped loving her and never will. Yes, the path of true love is often jagged and painful in the heartbreaking world of country. 

Lynn often played the battle of the sexes for laughs, as on the jokey novelty Twitty duet Youre The Reason Our Kids Are Ugly. But she also played it for tragedy. When The Tingle Becomes A Chill, Lynns follow-up single to The Pill, captures with chilling precision a dying relationship where the giddy intoxication and excitement of young love have long since given way to the sour settling and abandoned dreams of a loveless union kept alive solely through inertia and apathy. 

Wings Upon Your Horns likens the loss of the protagonists virginity to the fall from Eden, transforming a pure-hearted virgin into a woman [she] cant stand. To iron songbirds like Wells, Tammy Wynette, and Lynn, extramarital sex was a Pandoras Box that unleashed an evil upon the world that could not be contained. Only marriage could transform sex from a sin to part of Gods divine plan. 

Lynns productivity slowed dramatically after the 70s. Shes only released three solo albums in the 25 years since 1985s Just A Woman. Thankfully, one of those albums was 2004s jaw-dropping Van Lear Rose, an album-length collaboration with longtime admirer Jack White of the White Stripes, who plays electric guitar and produces. 

Van Lear Rose is an album of bracing clarity and focus. Theres an exhilarating intimacy and directness to Lynns vocals: Like Merle Haggard on this years I Am What I Am, Lynn has no use for affectation, stylization, or obfuscation. Time and experience seems to have washed away her defenses and blessed her music with emotional transparency. Van Lear Rose is an album by an icon empowered rather than diminished by age. 

On the title track, Lynn sings movingly of her hometown of Van Lear and the titular character, an incandescent charmer who had the whole town under her spell yet, like a fairy-tale princess, rejected the princes of her humble little burg and found true love with a common man. Its a sweet, almost sappy attempt to transform family lorethe song, not surprisingly, is about her parentsinto folklore, but its also shatteringly powerful thanks to the alchemy between Lynns beautifully weathered voice and Whites spare, expressive guitar. 

Van Lear Rose doubles as the consummation of White and Lynns intergenerational musical relationship. But Portland Oregon, their one duet, represents full-on musical fucking. Hot, sweaty, cum-and-whiskey-on-the-floor, close-the-shades, wake-the-neighbors, holy-shit-I-hope-youre-on-the-pill, pop-icon-on-pop-icon fucking. Did I mention that its sexy? Its far sexier and raunchier and more orgasmic than any duet between a grown man and a woman old enough to be his grandmother should be. 

On Family Tree, Lynn returns triumphantly to a pervasive themeher willingness to beat a bitch down if she catches her making goo-goo eyes at her manalbeit with more sadness and hurt than rage. Have Mercy is a rockabilly raver that burns nearly as hot as Portland Oregon, and High On a Mountaintop is a raucous, sing-along celebration of country life. 

Van Lear Rose introduced a whole new generation to Lynns inherent awesomeness. Whites production veers far from country into minimalist blues and rock. Hes managed to update Lynns sound while retaining her essence. The comeback album captures Lynn both as a towering American institution and as an all-too-human survivor who never hid her weaknesses or failings from an adoring public that embraced her messy, undeniable humanity. 



Loretta Lynn Receives Star-Filled Tribute at Home


Tony R. Phipps, FilmMagic.com

by:Varnell Hackett
Loretta Lynn kept saying "I don't know what's going on; nobody has told me anything," as she met with press last Friday night in Hurricane Mills, Tenn., where she was honored with "A Tribute to an American Icon" for her 50 years in country music. And it was certainly a night full of surprises for the country icon.

Loretta's first single, 'I'm a Honky Tonk Girl,' was released in 1960. When asked how she has managed to stay humble over the years, Loretta was quick to reply, "I look at these awards and honors as if they belonged to someone else. I can close my eyes and I know where I come from."

The singer also insisted that over the years her fans have become her friends, and that she still loves being on stage. "I go out now when I want to," she explained. "But before, I used to have to go out because I had to. When I was traveling so much before, I often wished I could stay home because I would have liked to spent more time with my kids when they were small. The kids are all grown now, so it's a little easier."

Loretta said she continues to write songs, commenting that she has written a lot in the past few years with Shawn Camp. "I bet he's mad at me though because we haven't written in six or seven months," the singer joked. "But we're gonna write again soon."

Shawn was on hand for the ceremony, as were Loretta's younger sister Crystal Gayle, and singers Terri Clark, Marty Stuart, Ronnie McDowell, Ray Walker of the Jordanaires and Grand Ole Opry star Jack Green. Loretta received many commendations of recognition from various organizations. Ronnie presented her with a painting of her as a young girl, and Ray recounted the story of how the Jordanaires were on the singer's first Nashville recording session. Many of Loretta's friends sent well-wishes via video including Keith Anderson, Big Kenny, Amy Grant, Wynonna, Dolly and Martina McBride.

Crystal told the attendees that Loretta opened doors for all the women who came after her. "It's hard work to be in the music business, and for Loretta to stay on top of her game for 50 years is fantastic," she said to enthusiastic applause of agreement.

Marty recalled something he had seen happen firsthand, when some years ago an interviewer called Loretta the Queen of Country Music. "She stopped him immediately and said, 'Kitty Wells is the Queen, Tammy Wynette is the First Lady, and I'm just a Coal Miner's Daughter.' I can tell you this tonight, her love for her fans keeps her going, and no matter where she goes in this world, she will be welcome."

John Carter Cash, who has been working with Loretta in the studio, re-recording many of her biggest hits, said, "Loretta Lynn is as real on the inside as she is on the outside. She and my mother were both mountain girls, and she has the same heart as my mother."

An album titled 'Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn,' will be released on November 9. Among the artists who perform on it are Miranda Lambert and Sheryl Crow, who are on the current single with Loretta, 'Coal Miner's Daughter.'

"I had six more verses written on that song and I took it in to [producer] Owen Bradley and he said to me, 'There's already been one 'El Paso,' Loretta, make that song shorter!' When I wrote it I didn't think it was gonna be such a hit; I just thought it was another song about life."

Commenting on her singing partners on the new album, Loretta said, "I love Miranda, she is feisty enough to do what she wants. Sheryl is more pop but we did a good job on that song!" Loretta acknowledges that she didn't get to put everyone she wanted to on this album. Of the other folks who are on the tribute, the singer said, "I love Kid Rock. He does that song ('I Know How') a lot different from the way I did."

Loretta and the songs that have entertained hundreds of thousands of people around the world are also being honored with an all-star concert in October at the Ryman Auditorium. The show is part of the Grammy Salute to Country Music series. Despite family and friends trying to keep some things secret from Loretta, one of the major players managed to let the cat out of the bag.

"Garth [Brooks] called me last week and he started talking about this tribute at the Ryman," Loretta said. "I said to him, 'Garth there are a lot of things going on that they aren't telling me about.' I guess he let that out a little early," she added with a laugh.

Among honors she has already received, 'Coal Miner's Daughter' was chosen for preservation within the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress, which annually honors select recordings for cultural, historic or aesthetic significance. The singer's 1976 memoir, 'Coal Miner's Daughter,' was re-released on September 21.

Loretta Lynn Honored for 50 Years of Music

Loretta Lynn photo courtesy of Sony Music Nashville.

by: Tom Roland

Five decades ago, Loretta Lynn and her husband-manager, Mooney Lynn, drove station to station around the U.S. promoting her first single, Im A Honky Tonk Girl. All these years later, shes a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and a global symbol for country music, and she was honored Friday at her Coal Miners Daughter Museum in Tennessee for 50 years as an American icon.

A bevy musicians and music-industry executives were on hand for the occasion, including Marty Stuart, Crystal Gayle, Jack Greene and Terri Clark. Ronnie McDowell presented Loretta a painting he had created, depicting her when she was 10 years old and living in Kentucky. A string of presenters included John Carter Cash, arranger Bill Walker and Ray Walker, of the Jordanaires, the Hall of Fame vocal quartet that backed Loretta on such classics as Youre Lookin At Country, Blue Kentucky Girl, Dont Come Home A-Drinkin (With Lovin On Your Mind) and Coal Miners Daughter.

There were also video tributes from Wynonna, Big Kenny, Keith Anderson, Martina McBride, Kellie Pickler and Dolly Parton. The ceremony took place in a sweat-filled tent outside the museum. The museum houses an extraordinary volume of memorabilia, including letters from presidents, stage wear and a string of awards none of which have led Loretta to think of herself as anything other than the little girl who grew up in poverty in an eastern Kentucky shack.

I look at these awards like theyre somebody elses, she said. That way you can stay grounded. Im proud of my awards and every one I get, you know You just dont forget where you come from. All I do is close my eyes, and I know where Im from. I go back to that little ol one-room cabin where I lived til I was 11 years old.

Nevertheless, Fridays celebration is the first of several that will mark her 50-year history as a country star. On Nov. 9, Columbia will release Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn, featuring remakes of her songs by the likes of Kid Rock, Carrie Underwood, Sheryl Crow and Miranda Lambert.

And on Oct. 12, shell be honored in a Grammy Salute To Country at the Ryman Auditorium. Reba McEntire will host that event with appearances by Martina, Jack White, Gretchen Wilson and Lee Ann Womack. And, it appears, Garth Brooks.

Garth Brooks called me last week, Loretta laughed, and I said, Garth, theres a lot of things goin on that I dont know about and they aint tellin me. I found out, too, that hes givin me the award. So he was on the phone long enough to give that away. That was good.

The salute at the Ryman is nicely timed. It comes three days before the 50-year anniversary of Lorettas first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry, which took place on that very stage.

Loretta Lynn Looks Ahead to Golden Anniversary and Beyond

by:Lime Wire
its ironic sometimes that the more things change in the music industry, the more it stays the same. Forty years ago, Loretta Lynn watched as the musical story of her life Coal Miners Daughter topped the chart, later becoming a Academy-Award winning movie in 1980. Now, here we are in 2010, and Loretta Lynns current single? You guessed it, Coal Miners Daughter.

Of course, there is a little bit of difference between the two records. Since issuing the original in 1970, Lynn has released two best-selling books and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1988. The new version of the song is a collaboration with Miranda Lambert and Sheryl Crow, and is the first single from Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn, an all-star tribute to the singer that will be released by Columbia Records on November 9th.

After all these years, the legend says she still was surprised by the success of the song. I had six more verses to that song, she recalls. I went in to sing it to Owen Bradley, my producer. He looked at me, and said Loretta, theres already been one El Paso, and there will never be another. Go in there and sit down and take six verses off. Thats what I had to do. I just thought it would be another song. I didnt really think about it being anything, but it was a smash, and I was proud. Im proud to be a coal miners daughter.

The singer recently took time to visit with the press at her ranch in Hurricane Mills, TN to discuss the 50-year anniversary of her first hit, Im A Honky Tonk Girl. Several of her fellow artists were present for the occasion, such as Jack Greene, Marty Stuart, and Terri Clark.

Though she is celebrating her golden anniversary of recording and touring, Lynn says she loves it as much as ever. I still enjoy being on stage, more now than I used to because used to, I had to. Now, I dont have to, and I really enjoy it. When my kids were little, I would have liked to stayed home more, but now that theyre gone, why stay home? I still enjoy it, and I like it, so I get after it.

lltrib

The tribute album is something that she is very excited about, as well. She had approval of each artist and recording on it, and she is happy with the results. It was hard to narrow it down because there are so many great artists. I love Kid Rock, He sung I Know How. Its great. He done something with it that I didnt do. All of the artists have done things with the songs that I didnt do, and I love it. Some of the artists that appear on the disc include Faith Hill (Love Is The Foundation) and Lee Ann Womack (Im A Honky Tonk Girl).

After all these years, Lynn is still creating. Her 2004 album Van Lear Rose remains a pleasant memory, as well as a critical success. Jack White is one of the greatest people I have ever met, she says of the White Stripes leader, who manned the controls for the album. He produced Van Lear Rose, which was probably the most country album I have ever done. Owen Bradley would have been jealous, she says of her legendary producer at Decca/MCA. She is finishing up a project with John Carter Cash, and has been writing with Nashville tunesmith Shawn Camp. Hes a great writer, she exclaims of the writer of such hits as How Long Gone and Would You Go With Me.

Another group of people that is very important to Loretta is her fans. They have been with her since the beginning in 1960, and she views them as a lot more closer than a lot of todays artists. Theyre my friends, not my fans. Ive met them over and over and over, she adds.

So, what has kept her grounded over the years? She says its rather easy. I look at the awards like they are somebody elses. That way you can stay grounded. Im proud of my awards, but I think to stay grounded, you dont want to forget where you come from. All I do is close my eyes, and I go back to that one room cabin where I lived till I was eleven.

And the legend continues.

Loretta Lynn celebrates 50 years in country music

http://www.wkrn.com/global/Category.asp?c=175880&autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=5143744&flvUri=&partnerclipid=

HURRICANE MILLS, Tenn. Loretta Lynn hosted a star-studded party at her ranch on Friday night celebrating her fiftieth year in country music.

"When you think of country music in Nashville, you think of Loretta Lynn," sister Crystal Gayle said.

"The Grand Ole Opry is something that every country singer dreams of being on. It is the greatest show on earth," Lynn told News 2.

Lynn will be performing on the newly renovated stage at the Grand Ole Opry House on Thursday night, as the Opry honors her and her 50- year music career. 

"The Grand Ole Opry is something I listened to as a little girl. [I] never dreamed that I'd ever go through the door of the Grand Ole Opry when I was little," Lynn said.

After humble beginnings, Lynn speaks fondly on where it all began.

"All I do is close my eyes and I know where I'm from. I go back to that little one room cabin where I lived until I was 11-years-old."

I'm proud to be a coal miner's daughter. I am," Lynn said.

Loretta Lynn Celebrates Legendary Career with 50th Anniversary Event Sept. 24

Invitation-only celebration to be held at Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills
Loretta Lynn  is celebrating her 50th year making music with a special invitation-only event to be held Friday, Sept. 24, at the famed Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tenn.

Held on-site at Lynns 18,000 square foot Coal Miners Daughter Museum and billed as A Tribute to an American Icon, the evenings activities include a catered reception, media Q&A session and a performance by Lynns sister, Crystal Gayle, following the official unveiling of Gayles new display inside the museum.  Event invitations were extended to select industry, media and artists, as well as Lynns family and closest friends.

The media Q&A session begins at 5:30 p.m. CST, with the reception following at 6 p.m.  Lynn will appear at the reception to briefly address the events attendees and mingle with other artists, industry and media.  Gayles performance is at 9 p.m. and is open to the public.

Lynns A Tribute to an American Icon 50th anniversary celebration coincides with the superstars final performance of the year at her Hurricane Mills ranch and home, to be held Saturday, Sept. 25.  The concert is open to the public and is one of the special attractions available during the weekend events for Lynns fans and the general public.  Visit www.LorettaLynn.com for more information and to purchase tickets to the show.

Lynns much-anticipated tribute album, Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn, will be released through Columbia Records on Nov. 9, 2010.  The project, which features special guests Sheryl Crow, Steve Earle, Faith Hill, Alan Jackson, Kid Rock, Miranda Lambert, Martina McBride, Allison Moorer, Paramore, Reba, Carrie Underwood, The White Stripes, Lucinda Williams, Gretchen Wilson and Lee Ann Womack, features an updated version of her classic track, Coal Miners Daughter.  The single, performed by Lynn with Miranda Lambert and Sheryl Crow, shipped to Country radio on Sept. 14 and is available for digital download purchase on Sept. 28.

The Loretta Lynn Ranch and Coal Miners Daughter Museum is located at 44 Hurricane Mills Road, Hurricane Mills, TN, 37978.  Call (931) 296-7700 or visit www.LorettaLynn.com for more information.

Note to Nashville Media:
A special media-only bus is available for transportation to and from the ranch on Friday, Sept. 24.  The bus departs Nashville at 3:30 p.m. CST and is expected to return at approximately 10 p.m.  Invited media attendees should RSVP Christy Watkins at Christy@aristomedia.com to reserve a seat on the bus.

About Loretta Lynn:
A true icon of Country music and American culture, Loretta Lynn, also known as the Coal Miners Daughter, is celebrating the 50th anniversary of her debut single this year.  A member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, a four-time GRAMMY honoree and a recipient of the GRAMMY Lifetime Achievement Award, Lynn began her career with the 1960 success of her debut single, Im a Honky Tonk Girl.  The event launched a musical legacy that has included 16 No. 1 singles, including such classics as Ones on the Way, Dont Come Home A-Drinkin (with Lovin on Your Mind), and Lynns signature song, Coal Miners Daughter.  The song also shared its name with Lynns bestselling 1976 autobiography and the Academy Award-winning 1980 film starring Sissy Spacek.  Loretta Lynn: Coal Miners Daughter is being re-issued in paperback by Vintage Books in September, with a new foreword by Lynn.  In October 2010, Lynn will be honored at Nashvilles Ryman Auditorium with a presentation of The Recording Academys Presidents Merit Award in recognition of her remarkable career and contributions to Country music.

Loretta Lynn to Be Honored by Reba, Martina, Gretchen + More

She recorded her first album and scored her first hit single when she was still a teenager. Now, 50 years into a remarkable career, Loretta Lynn is still writing, recording and performing -- and getting ready for a big celebration to mark a half-century in the music business.

The multiple-Grammy winner will be honored with the Recording Academy President's Merit Award in a special ceremony October 12 at Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium. Hosted by Reba McEntire, the evening will include performances by several of Music City's biggest stars, including Martina McBride, Gretchen Wilson and Lee Ann Womack, as well as a special appearance by Jack White (producer of Loretta's Grammy-winning 2004 album, 'Van Lear Rose'), with more performances expected to be announced in the coming weeks.

The event falls only a few weeks before the release of the album, 'Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn,' which will include performances of the 75-year-old icon's songs by artists from all genres, specially chosen by Loretta, including Sheryl Crow, Carrie Underwood, Lucinda Williams, Kid Rock, Faith Hill, Alan Jackson, Steve Earle and many more.

2010 has been a year filled with celebrations and honors for the legendary singer. In January, she received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, along with Michael Jackson, Bobby Darin, songwriter Leonard Cohen and others.

Loretta continues to tour the country.

COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER A TRIBUTE TO LORETA LYNN TRACK LIST

Dont Come Home A Drinkin (with Lovin on Your Mind) Gretchen Wilson

Im a Honky Tonk Girl Lee Ann Womack

Rated X The White Stripes

Youre Lookin at Country Carrie Underwood

Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man Alan Jackson and Martina McBride

You Aint Woman Enough (to Take My Man) Paramore

Love Is the Foundation Faith Hill

After the Fire Is Gone Steve Earle and Allison Moorer

If Youre Not Gone Too Long Reba

I Know How Kid Rock

Somebody Somewhere (Dont Know What Hes Missin Tonight) Lucinda Williams

Coal Miners Daughter Loretta Lynn, Sheryl Crow, and Miranda Lambert

Loretta Lynn, Sheryl Crow & Miranda Lambert Sing "Coal Miner's Daughter"

By Jessica Letkemann Billboard HEAR THE SINGLE CLICK ON THE THE LINK  http://soundcloud.com/billboard/coal-miners-daughter-by-loretta-lynn/s-PPWei

Loretta Lynn has been a country star since her first single, "I'm A  Honky Tonk Girl" reached the top 20 of the Country Songs chart in 1960. But it was her 1970 smash, "Coal Miner's Daughter," that became her most iconic. Now, forty years after it topped Country Songs and went on to become both a book and a movie, Lynn has remade her famous song with two other hitmaking women, none other than Sheryl Crow and Miranda Lambert and Billboard.com has it here for you to listen to, exclusively, days before you can hear it on the radio on Sept. 14 or anywhere else, as well as a brief Q&A with the country legend herself about remaking the song.The new version of "Coal Miner's Daughter," which will be available as a digital single on Sept. 28, is the centerpiece of the upcoming Nov. 9 Columbia album, "Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn" which celebrates Lynn's 50 years of making music with rock and country stars covering many of her hits. In addition to Lambert and Crow,  Carrie Underwood, Faith Hill, Kid Rock, the White Stripes, Paramore, Alan Jackson and Steve Earle are among the artists Lynn hand-picked for the all-star project.

Why did you specifically want to collaborate with Sheryl Crow and Miranda Lambert on the reinterpretation of your most iconic song, "Coal Miner's Daughter"?

Loretta Lynn: I love Miranda and Sheryl and I really felt they both brought something different singing style wise to this song. Miranda is so country and has a sassiness to her you can hear it as soon as she sings her first line "my daddy worked all night in the Van Lear coal mine..."! Sheryl adds such a soulfulness to her lines. I loved both. I am so happy and proud they did the song with me.

"Coal Miner's Daughter" was recently added the the National Recording Registry. What do you think makes it such a treasure?
Can you believe that? I think that the song Coal Miner's Daughter, the book and my movie shined a light on coal mining and a different way of life a lot people did not know about.

Forty years later, do you still feel like a coal miner's daughter?
Well I am and will always be proud to be a coal miner's daughter.

COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER SINGLE RELEASE SEPT. 14TH

Single Ships to Country Radio on Tuesday, September 14th;
Hear It Now in an Exclusive Preview on Billboard.com;
Digital Single Available September 28

Nashville, TN The stage is set for the all-star November 9 release of Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn with word that the first single will be the title track, Lynns iconic classic, Coal Miners Daughter, featuring Lynn, Sheryl Crow, and Miranda Lambert.

In an exclusive preview that began today, Billboard.com is streaming the single, which will ship and be available digitally to country radio on Tuesday, September 14.

In addition to its inclusion on the upcoming album, fans will be able to purchase the new recording as a digital single, releasing September 28.

Loretta Lynn Tribute Album Due November 9th

I am so happy that these singers wanted to do this record, said LYNN. I love em all, and it was so great to hear all the different ways they did my hits, she said, referring to how each artist recorded with their own choice of producer and musicians. I hope people like it as much as I do and we sell a bunch of records
The artists that will contribute tracks to the tribute album celebrating LORETTA LYNNs 50th Anniversary in the music business have been announced. Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute To LORETTA LYNN, will be released on NOVEMBER 9th and will include artists such as: FAITH HILL, ALAN JACKSON, KID ROCK, MIRANDA LAMBERT, SHERYL CROW, STEVE EARLE, GRETCHEN WILSON, LUCINDA WILLIAMS, The WHITE STRIPES, CARRIE UNDERWOOD, LEE ANN WOMACK, PARAMORE, REBA McENTIRE and ALLISON MOORER.

Loretta Picks Rockers for Tribute

A major country record label told Loretta Lynn she could pick any artist she wanted for a tribute album to celebrate her 50th anniversary in the biz.

And yes, some country giants are in there, including Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire, Faith Hill and Carrie Underwood.

But, according to a list released this morning (Sept. 2), Loretta also picked some rock and alternative acts to be on Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn, which is coming out Nov. 9.

Those include Kid Rock, pop-punksters Paramore, Sheryl Crow and The White Stripes, which includes lead singer Jack White, who produced Lorettas latest album.

Others on Lorettas tribute album: Steve Earle, Miranda Lambert, Martina McBride, Allison Moorer, Lucinda Williams, Gretchen Wilson and Lee Ann Womack.

Carrie Underwood to appear on Loretta Lynn tribute album

Loretta Lynn has been in the music business a whopping 50 years, and she's teaming up with her celebrity pals to mark the occasion in a special album. Lynn has rounded up Sheryl Crow, Faith Hill, Alan Jackson, Kid Rock, Miranda Lambert, Martina McBride, Paramore, Reba McEntire, Carrie Underwood, Steve Earle, the White Stripes, Lucinda Williams, Gretchen Wilson, Allison Moorer and Lee Ann Womack to contribute tracks to Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn. The artists will put their own spin on some of Lynn's classic hits. The album will be out Nov. 9.

Loretta Lynn Pals Join her for a Golden Tribute

Loretta Lynn has been in the music business a whopping 50 years, and she's teaming up with her celebrity pals to mark the occasion in a special album. Lynn has rounded up Sheryl Crow, Faith Hill, Alan Jackson, Kid Rock, Miranda Lambert, Martina McBride, Paramore, Reba McEntire, Carrie Underwood, Steve Earle, the White Stripes, Lucinda Williams, Gretchen Wilson, Allison Moorer and Lee Ann Womack to contribute tracks to Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn. The artists will put their own spin

Take a stand and fight for the nation's future

To the editor:

Happiness in life depends on the quality of your thoughts. Do you treasure your liberty and freedom? They are your God-given rights, but if theyre in danger of being taken away, you must be willing to speak up and fight.

America may stumble and fall on hard times; dark clouds may hover, but only for a while.

The men who composed the Declaration of Independence and framed the U.S. Constitution with its Bill of Rights never intended for our country to be controlled or ruled by a far-left, progressive, socialist government willing to bow to Islamists and ignore the communist United Nations plans for a one-world government.

Remember these words: When the crooked politicians vote themselves benefits (your tax money) from the U.S. Treasury or just print any amount they want, our republic will falter. People become complacent then slip into apathy and dependence on government handouts (redistribution of property, i.e., communism). Let this happen and you will end up in bondage as slaves.

Sixty-two years ago, I took an oath and drew a line in the sand. My oath still stands today to protect my country, defend the Constitution and support my brethren in the U.S. Armed Forces, active and retired as well as all the veterans who defend our freedom. Draw your own line in the sand today.

I have no intention to give in, surrender or give up my fights against tyranny in all its forms fascist, communist, radical Islamist, far-left progressive liberals (socialists), one-world order types, community dis-organizers, cowards and any other type of wannabe dictators.

Your time on Earth is limited. What you do with your life while here matters. Your happiness depends on your thoughts and actions.

Use your pencil in the voting booth in November but remember freedom is not free. Lets run the tyrants out of Washington, D.C. Stand and fight with me. Never give in to tyranny and or give up to tyrants.

God bless America and her military. Be proud of your liberty and freedom. And sometime when you need it, get a hold of Loretta Lynns recording of God Bless America Again. Her song will touch your heart.

George Pat Patrick

Hubert

Loretta Lynn Playing Million Dollar ELM

Starting with her 1971 hit, Youre Looking At Country, the strong, independent, hardcore honky-tonk singer has won four Grammy awards, seven American Music Awards, and 10 Academy of Country Music Awards with hits such as When the Tingle Becomes a Chill" (1975) and You Aint Woman Enough to Take My Man.

Fifty years ago, her first song ever to hit the Billboard Charts was Honky Tonk Girl. Shes well-known for Coal Miners Daughter, the title of her 1976 autobiography later made into an Academy Award-winning film starring Sissy Spacek.

Fewer than a few weeks from her Tulsa performance in Tulsa, Lynn will be honored in a Grammy Salute To Country Music on Tuesday, Oct. 12, at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn. The star-studded tribute will feature a special presentation of the Recording Academy Presidents Merit Award to three-time Grammy winner and Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Loretta Lynn in honor of her dynamic career and contributions to country music.

Lynn teamed up with White Stripes guitarist Jack White in 2004 to produce the two-time Grammy-winning album "Van Lear Rose."

Read more from this Tulsa World article at http://www.tulsaworld.com/scene/article.aspx?subjectid=269&articleid=20100819_371_0_Americ26388

Portland Oregon On My Mind

FRIDAYS TUNES.
Loretta Lynn & Jack White
"Portland, Oregon" Van Lear Rose. Lord knows I've lost my mind in Oregon. I live about eight miles to the north of this state, across the Columbia river. The first time I heard this tune was on the radio and at first it sounded like a band from the sixties. "Is that Loretta Lynn?" I thought. Wow what a sound. ANd sure enough it was with retro sound master Jack White.

Can is sweet!!!! This songs is pretty rad. I love the song "Mushroom Head" from them, though. Soooo sick!!! I love Jack White's band Dead Weathers newest album. That one you have to crank up. That production is so good and gritty sounding. SOunds very Hendrixy. One of my new favorite albums. I need to check out that Loretta Lynn album they did together. Sounds interesting.

Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn

"Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn" All-Star Collection Slated to Release on November 9
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Nashville, TN A galaxy of stars from throughout the world of music will celebrate Country Music Hall of Fame member and GRAMMY Lifetime Achievement Award winner Loretta Lynn, as Columbia Nashville prepares for the November 9 release of Coal Miners Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn.

With participating artists and additional information still to come, the album coincides with an array of 50th anniversary celebratory events, including the September 2010 paperback re-issue of Lynns 1976 bestselling memoir, Loretta Lynn: Coal Miners Daughter. This October, The Recording Academy will host GRAMMY Salute to Country Music, a star-filled tribute concert honoring Lynn at Nashvilles Ryman Auditorium, where shell be presented with The Recording Academys Presidents Merit Award in recognition of her enduring contributions to country music. Earlier this year, her landmark song, Coal Miners Daughter, was one of only 25 sound recordings chosen in 2010 for preservation within the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress, which annually honors a select group of recordings for their cultural, historic, or aesthetic significance.

About Loretta Lynn

A true icon of country music and American culture, Loretta Lynn, the Coal Miners Daughter, is this year celebrating the 50th anniversary of her debut single. A recipient of the GRAMMY Lifetime Achievement Award and a three-time GRAMMY winner and member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, Lynns career began with the 1960 success of her debut single, Im a Honky Tonk Girl. The event marked not only the arrival of her distinct voice as both songwriter and performer, but also launched a musical legacy that has included 16 #1 singles, including such classics as Ones on the Way, Dont Come Home aDrinkin (with Lovin on Your Mind), and her signature song, Coal Miners Daughter. That song also shared its name with Lynns bestselling 1976 autobiography and the Academy Award winning 1980 film starring Sissy Spacek. Loretta Lynn: Coal Miners Daughter is being re-issued in paperback by Vintage Books in September, with a new foreward by Lynn. Random House Audio will simultaneously release the audio edition on CD and digital download, with narration by Spacek. This October, The Recording Academy will host GRAMMY Salute to Country Music, when Lynn will be honored at Nashvilles Ryman Auditorium with a star-studded tribute concert and a presentation of The Recording Academys Presidents Merit Award in recognition of her remarkable career and contributions to country music.

Loretta Lynn's 50-Year Career Honored With Special Events

 Loretta Lynn will be celebrated in song on 'A Coal Miner's Daughter: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn,' set for November 9 release on Columbia Records. The label is mum on which artists we can expect to hear on the album but the disc coincides with several events designed to celebrate 50 years since Loretta's song 'I'm a Honky Tonk Girl' was released.

Planned events to celebrate Loretta include the September reissue of her 1976 memoir 'Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner's Daughter.' In addition, The Recording Academy will host 'A Grammy Salute to Country Music Honoring Loretta Lynn' on October 12 at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium. During what organizers promise will be a "star-filled tribute concert," Loretta will receive the Recording Academy's President's Merit Award in recognition of her enduring contributions to country music.


Getting a head-start with a Loretta tribute of her own, in July, Boston-based singer Eilen Jewell released 'Butcher Holler,' an album filled with songs that Loretta wrote. Eilen is such a devoted fan of Loretta's that she has a side project - also called "Butcher Holler' -- that exclusively performs the iconic entertainer's songs. "We love playing her music," Eileen tells AnnArbor.com. "It's just a lot of fun to play those songs because Loretta is such a big hero of ours." (To preview and download 'Butcher Holler,' click here.)

Loretta is currently on tour with concerts on August 13 in Wichita, Kan., and August 14 in Fort Worth, Texas. For a complete list of dates and cities, check here.

LORETTA TRIBUTE CD RELEASE NOV 2010

COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER A TRIBUTE WILL BE RELEASED IN NOVEMBER 2010 ON BNA COLUMBIA RECORDS DETAILS TO FOLLOW

Daughter of Van Lear Rose

Rising star Eilen Jewell, the Boston-by-way-of Boise singer/songwriter, has a new album that is a tribute to Loretta Lynn (above) called "Butcher Holler" ( No. 1 on the Freeform American Roots Chart in August and No. 1 on the Roots Music Report's True Country Chart ).

She will perform at the Wildcat Theater in Shepherd Union at Weber State University on Wednesday, Sept. 8 at 7 p.m. Purchase tickets at Dee Events Center Box Office or Grounds for Coffee (30th & Harrison and 25th Street locations).

General Admission is $15, with $18 the price the day of the concert.

All students are $10, and 16 & under FREE (but must have a ticket).

Expose the young ones to the music of Lynn, and they won't be disappoint

Whos Gonna Take Your Garbage Out Loretta Lynn and Ernest Tubb

Friday Five: Whos Gonna

Juli Thanki | August 6th, 2010

  • The Wounded Heart Of America5. Whos Gonna Build Your Wall Tom Russell

    Here Russell contemplates the construction of a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and asks what would happen should Uncle Sam [send] the illegals home: Whos gonna mow your lawn?/Whos gonna cook your Mexican food/When your Mexican maid is gone? Russell sings that he aint got no politics, but he sure can write a decent song or two.

  • Song of the Traveling Daughter4. Whos Gonna Shoe Abigail Washburn

    Lots of artists have recorded this song under various titles, including the Everly Brothers, Woody Guthrie and Cisco Houston. I like this version from Washburns solo debut, Song of the Traveling Daughter, as sheaccompanied by her trusty banjoputs a feminine spin on the traditional lyrics.

  • 21 #1 Hits: The Ultimate Collection3. Whos Gonna Mow Your Grass Buck Owens

    In addition to said grass mowing, this fella serves breakfast in bed and chops firewood for the unappreciative lady in his life. He should just pack up his Nudie suits and go.

  • George Jones - 16 Biggest Hits2. Whos Gonna Fill Their Shoes George Jones

    Whos Gonna Fill Their Shoes? hit #3 in 85. 25 years later were still asking the same question.

  • 1. Whos Gonna Take Your Garbage Out Loretta Lynn and Ernest Tubb

    The Texas Troubadour is my favorite duet partner for Lynn, and the two of them are excellent here on this playful he said, she said song from1969s If We Put Our Heads Together. That album is only available on vinyl, so if youre not one who enjoys haunting your local record store, Rosie Flores and Jon Langford did an excellent version of this song on Flores album Girl of the Century.

COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER BOOK RE-RELEASED SEPT. 21ST 2010

The Recording Academy Hosts GRAMMY Salute To Country MusicSM Honoring Loretta Lynn

Presented by MasterCard, the Event will Spotlight the Country Music Legend on Oct. 12 at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn.

SANTA MONICA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Continuing the tradition of celebrating musical excellence 365 days of the year, The Recording Academy will host GRAMMY Salute To Country MusicSM honoring Loretta Lynn, presented by MasterCard. In its sophomore year, the event will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010 at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn. The star-studded tribute will feature performances by some of Nashville's finest artists and will include a special presentation of The Recording Academy President's Merit Award to three-time GRAMMY winner and Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Lynn in honor of her dynamic career and contributions to country music.

It is only fitting that we celebrate Loretta at our Salute To Country Music event, as she has worked diligently to ensure that country music remains a vital part of our culture, and has paved the way for many of today's talented artists and likely for generations to come.

"We are delighted to be paying homage to Loretta Lynn, a true country music pioneer and cultural icon, whose distinctive musical style has confronted social issues while remaining wildly entertaining," said Neil Portnow, President/CEO of The Recording Academy. "It is only fitting that we celebrate Loretta at our Salute To Country Music event, as she has worked diligently to ensure that country music remains a vital part of our culture, and has paved the way for many of today's talented artists and likely for generations to come."

"MasterCard is proud to support The Recording Academy's GRAMMY events and their celebration of music's greats, such as Loretta Lynn," said Cheryl Guerin, Senior Vice President, U.S. Marketing and Global Digital Marketing, MasterCard Worldwide. "This partnership provides our cardholders with a number of extraordinary opportunities to experience some of the worlds most renowned musicians up close and personal."

With a career spanning 50 years, three-time GRAMMY winner Loretta Lynn has created music infused with honesty and energy. From the beginning of her career in 1960, she introduced a strong, independent female voice at a time when women in country music were more reserved. She became an advocate for real women with such hits as "Don't Come Home A Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind)," "Your Squaw Is On The Warpath," and "The Pill." Her hit song "Coal Miner's Daughter," also the title of her 1976 autobiography, would later be made into an acclaimed feature film, garnering an Academy Award for Sissy Spacek, who played Lynn in the title role. In 2004, Lynn teamed up with White Stripes guitarist Jack White who produced her two-time GRAMMY-winning album Van Lear Rose, which showcased her powerful vocals and skillful songwriting and further solidified her status as one of country music's trailblazing icons. Earlier this year, Lynn was honored with a 2010 Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. For more information, please visit www.lorettalynn.com. or for Media Contact:The Recording AcademyJennifer Keppel, 310-392-3777
jenniferk@grammy.com or For Loretta Lynn:Sony Music Nashville Allen Brown, 615-301-4340 allen.brown@sonymusic.com

Country Music News Roundup: Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn Weekend Updates
Lots of news coming out of Nashville on Butcher Holler, KY native, Loretta Lynn. You can listen to her play on the Grand Ole Opry Saturday night. If you cant be there in person, you can listen online on WSM Radio Station www.wsmonline.com.

Loretta Lynn's Best-Selling Memoir, Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner's Daughter, will be re-issued in September 2010 in as a paperback, e-book, and Audio Book Narrated by Sissy Spacek. The publication coincides with the 50th anniversary of Lynn's first single release (click here for details) and the 30th anniversary of the release of the Academy Award-winning movie "Coal Miner's Daughter."

Finally, the Library of Congresss National Recording Preservation Board announced this week its annual list of music that the organization deems important enough to preserve. It includes Little Richard (Tutti Frutti) and Loretta Lynn (Coal Miners Daughter) and entire albums from The Band (The Band) and Patti Smith (Horses).

Loretta Celebrates 50th year on the road with new book

Loretta 's 50th annv. road book is aval. check them out at the concerts and at the Lady Loretta store at the ranch. very nice book lots of unseen photos and a hand written letter from Loretta on the first page.


Kentucky Native Loretta Lynn Celebrates Birthday and 50 years in Business

 

Loretta Lynn still going strong after all these years
Loretta Lynn still going strong after all these years
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Jessica Cornett: 2010 is turning out to be a year of celebration for Butcher Holler, Kentucky native, Loretta Lynn. Seventy-five years ago in 1935 a young child was born in the hills of eastern Kentucky.  She would then grow up through the hard times and make her way through the ranks of country music to become a legend in the music industry.  Even after all of these years, she hasn't slowed down one bit.

This year also marks 50 years in the music business.  The Coal Miners Daughter has experienced some life changing events that some of us would never dreamed of.  She was married to Oliver "Mooney" Lynn, also known as Doo, when she was 14 and soon was having children of her own.  Mooney pushed her to get in the business and with hard work and persistence, her first single, "I'm a Honky Tonk Girl," reached #14 on Billboard's charts.

Loretta Lynn has been known to sing songs that women could relate to.  She was bold and sassy and didn't care to take risks of songs that were considered indecent at the time.  It is hard to believe in this day and age of music you hear on the radio that a song called "The Pill" or anything about drinking was considered indecent. Women country music listeners, and some men, to this day still love to listen to songs such as, "You Aint Woman Enough (to Take My Man)," Dont Come Home ADrinkin (with Lovin on Your Mind)," and Fist City among others that raced their way to the top of the charts.  Loretta was not afraid to stand up for herself.  To this day, she continues to influence women in country music She would later go on to perform award winning duets with Conway Twitty, as well as have a book and movie portraying her life called "Coal Miner's Daughter." By the time of her last major hit, I Lie, in 1982, Lynn had 52 Top 10 hits and 16 #1s. And who could not forget when asked to become a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, Loretta Lynn jumped right in the arms of Johnny Cash in 1998?

In 2005, Lynn received a Grammy Award for Best Country Album for "Van Lear Rose," produced by longtime fan, Jack White of the White Stripes.  Just a couple of months ago, she received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Today she is preparing to release two more albums in the future and keeping a performance schedule just as strong as she has held in recent years.  There are several Kentucky stops, including Hullabalou Festival on July 25th, and Renfro Valley on October 8th and 9th.

Lynn has proved that she is still woman enough to be strong in the music industry even to this day.

Coal Miner's Daughter RE-RELEASE

The memoirs of Country great LORETTA LYNN will be re-issued this SEPTEMBER by VINTAGE BOOKS, a division of RANDOM HOUSE. LORETTA LYNN: Coal Miners Daughter tells the story of her early life in BUTCHER HOLLER, KY and her rise to fame. Coal Miners Daughter is also the title of one of her biggest hit songs and the title of a film about her life, starring SISSY SPACEK, who won an ACADEMY AWARD for her role as LORETTA. RANDOM HOUSE AUDIO will simultaneously release the audio edition of the book on CD and via digital download, with SPACEK narrating. The book will also be available for the first time as an e-book. The memoir has been out of print since 1998. This is the 30th anniversary of the movie release and the 50th anniversary of LORETTAs first single release. LYNN writes in a new forward in the book, "I can hardly believe that its over 34 years since Coal Miners Daughter was first published. Its something to look back after more than 30 years, and it made me think about all my old friends and family, all the good times and not so good times. I hope you enjoy Coal Miners Daughter all over again. Or if youre coming to it for the first time."

Loretta Lynn's Coal Still on fire by Tom Roland

his fall will mark a whopping 40 years since Loretta Lynn hit radio waves with Coal Miners Daughter, but the song is enduring enough that it made news in not just one, but two different ways on Wednesday.

For starters, the book that carried the same name, Coal Miners Daughter, will be reissued in September by Vintage Books, which will market the autobiography as a paperback, an e-book and an audio book, narrated by Sissy Spacek. Sissy is, of course, a natural for that job, since she won an Oscar for portraying Loretta in the movie that was built around the book and even got a Grammy nomination for her own recording of Coal Miner. The movie, in fact, is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year.

In the meantime, Lorettas original version of Coal Miners Daughter was recognized permanently by the U.S. government yesterday. The Library of Congress announced that the song is being entered into the National Recording Registry, which recognizes important sound recordings from music to historic speeches. Coal Miner is one of 25 additions to the Registry alongside Willie Nelsons album Red Headed Stranger, Little Richards rock n roll classic Tutti Frutti, a narration of The Little Engine That Could and Bill Cosbys live comedy album I Started Out As A Child.

The Library of Congress established the Registry in 2003 and now has inducted a total of 300 recordings. Among the country releases already enshrined are George Jones He Stopped Loving Her Today, Patsy Clines Crazy, Carl Perkins Blue Suede Shoes and Johnny Cash At Folsom Prison.

Best-Selling Memoir, Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner's Daughter,

Best-Selling Memoir, Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner's Daughter, to be Re-Issued in September 2010 as Trade Paperback, E-book, and Audio Book

Loretta Lynn's Best-Selling Memoir, Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner's Daughter, to be Re-Issued in September 2010 in Trade Paperback from Vintage Books, As an E-book, and as an Audio Book Narrated by Sissy Spacek. The publication coincides with the 50th anniversary of Lynn's first single release and the 30th anniversary of the release of the Academy Award-winning movie "Coal Miner's Daughter."

New York, NY (PRWEB) June 24, 2010 -- The memoirs of country music legend Loretta Lynn will be re-issued with a new foreword by the author in September 2010 by Vintage Books, the literary paperback division of The Knopf Doubleday Group, Random House, Inc. Loretta Lynn: Coal Miners Daughter is Lynn's classic memoir, which tells the story of her early life in Butcher Holler, Kentucky, and her amazing ascent to the top of the music industry. Coal Miner's Daughter is not only the title of Lynn best-selling memoir, it is also the title of perhaps her most recognizable hit, and the title of the film about her life. Random House Audio will simultaneously release the audio edition on CD and via digital download with Sissy Spacek narrating (Spacek won an Academy Award for her portrayal of Loretta Lynn in the movie Coal Miners Daughter"). The book will also be available, for the first time, as an e-book. The memoir has been out of print since 1998.

"I can hardly believe that its over 34 years since Coal Miners Daughter was first published. Its something to look back after more than 30 years, and it made me think about all my old friends and family, all the good times and not so good times. If youre coming to it for the first time or are reading it all over again, I hope you enjoy Coal Miners Daughter," wrote Loretta Lynn in her new foreword.

Loretta Lynn is the undisputed queen of country music. Her fifty-year recording career will be celebrated throughout 2010, including a special Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award ceremony. 2010 marks the 50th anniversary of Loretta Lynn's first single release and the 30th anniversary of the movie "Coal Miner's Daughter" starring Spacek and Tommy Lee Jones.

Born into abject poverty, married at thirteen, mother of six, and a grandmother by the time she was twenty-nine, Loretta Lynn went on to become one of the most prolific and influential songwriters and singers in modern country music. Here we see the determination and talent that led to her trailblazing career and made her the first woman to be named Entertainer of the Year by the Country Music Association and the first woman to receive a gold record in country music.

Praise for Loretta Lynn: Coal Miners Daughter:
"Engaging reading even for many to whom country music is an alien world." -- The New York Times Book Review

"Few subjects are too difficult to deal with here, yet there is nothing sensationalistic...have met the real Loretta Lynn." -- Billboard

"So open, honest and warm that it's irresistible." -- New York Daily News

About the Author: In addition to being named Entertainer of the Year by the CMA, Loretta Lynn has had sixteen #1 singles, fifteen #1 albums, and countless other hit records. The fiftieth anniversary of her recording career in 2010 will be celebrated throughout the music industry. Loretta has continued to expand her musical reach, in 2004 recording Van Lear Rose with Jack White of the White Stripes. She will release two new CDs in 2010. She lives in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee. www.lorettalynn.com

Vintage Books was founded in 1954 by Alfred A. Knopf as a trade paperback home to its authors. Its publishing list includes a wide range, from the most influential works of world literature to cutting edge contemporary fiction and distinguished non-fiction. As the continuous publisher of important writers including William Faulkner, Vladimir Nabokov, Albert Camus, Ralph Ellison, Dashiell Hammett, William Styron, A.S. Byatt, Philip Roth, Toni Morrison, Ha Jin, Richard Ford, Cormac McCarthy, Alice Munro, Raymond Chandler, Orhan Pamuk, Dave Eggers, Robert Caro, Joseph Ellis, Haruki Murakami, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez it is today's foremost trade paperback publisher.

Contact: Russell Perreault, VP/Director of Publicity, Vintage Books & Anchor Books, (212) 572-2080.

Lynn on the road, having fun

by Jim Beal Jr:
Loretta Lynn is not homeless and living in a bus.

Tabloid reports to the contrary, the recent floods in and around Nashville, did not take the country superstar's home.

Ain't that somethin'? Lynn said about the homeless rumor. The water did get right up to my house. That scared me to death. No one could get in or out. We didn't have power for six days, so we used a tour bus generator for power.

Unfortunately, Lynn doesn't have a helicopter to get onto and off of her Tennessee ranch.

I wanted a helicopter so bad, she said, laughing, something she did a lot during a half-hour telephone interview. Years ago, I wanted a helicopter, so I talked to a man about buying a helicopter. Then I told Doo (her late husband, Oliver Mooney Lynn) this man wanted to talk to him. A while later Doo came up to me, You ain't gettin' no damned helicopter to get killed in.' So I never got my helicopter.

But Lynn did get a lot of things, including a bunch of hit songs, a handful of Grammys and a career that has lasted more than 50 years. Born in Butcher Holler, Ky., the daughter of a coal miner, just as her Coal Miner's Daughter song and autobiography, and the subsequent Academy Award-winning film said, Lynn started singing professionally in Washington state in the late '50s and early '60s.

I never thought about ever singing, she said. I would rock my babies and sing, but I only knew a couple songs like The Great Titanic' or White Christmas.' Back home I would sing those songs on the porch and my daddy would tell me, Loretty' he called me Loretty would you shut your big mouth? Everybody in the holler can hear you.' I told him everybody in the holler is related to us and nobody cared. He told me not to sass him. He died in 1959 and never heard me sing.

But a lot of people heard Loretta sing in a small Washington tavern that Lynn had to sneak into and out of because the owner didn't believe she was 21.

I was 21, she said, but barely. I already had four kids, but I never had a birth certificate. After I was singing at that tavern for about five months, the Zero label asked if I'd record for them. It made me zero, but it got me out of Washington state. I love Washington state, but I was ready to leave.

Loretta and Doo Lynn worked the road hard promoting her debut single I'm a Honky Tonk Girl to radio stations. By the time they reached Nashville, the single was a moderate hit, and Lynn started recording with producer Owen Bradley. A long string of hits followed. Songs such as Success, You Ain't Woman Enough, Don't Come Home A'Drinkin' (With Lovin' on Your Mind), Fist City, After the Fire Is Gone, songs Lynn wrote, ruled the country music charts. They also were written and sung from the point of view of a strong woman who refused to put up with nonsense from men or from women.I never, never thought about being a role model, Lynn said. I wrote from life, how things were in my life. I never could understand why others didn't write down what they knew.

Lynn then told a story about meeting a fan backstage before a concert in St. Louis.

This little lady said her husband wouldn't bring her to the show because he brought a girl he was seeing, Lynn said. I took her up to the stage curtain and asked her to point him out. We peeked out and there they were in about the third row. I told her, She ain't woman enough to take your man.' And she wasn't. She was all overblown. And she didn't take her man. I got a letter from that little lady a few weeks later and she caught that girlfriend in an alley and told her what was going to happen if she kept seeing her husband.

And Lynn got an excellent song, a classic, out of the encounter. You Ain't Woman Enough made it to No. 2 in 1966. But not all of her classics have gone the way she envisioned.

I had six more verses for Coal Miner's Daughter,' but Owen Bradley told me there's already been an El Paso' (an epic Marty Robbins song) and get in there and cut six verses, she said. I did. And now I can't remember all the verses. I think the tapes burned up in a fire.

Lynn could be counted upon to write, and sing, hits, solo and duets with Ernest Tubb and Conway Twitty. But Lynn's work, including Rated X, The Pill, When the Tingle Becomes a Chill and I Know How, while loved, and purchased, by herds of country music fans, weren't always embraced by radio stations.

I don't know why the radio-station owners thought every song I sang was a dirty song. They aren't, Lynn said with an indignant edge to her voice decades down the line.

I had a preacher in Texas come up to me after a show and ask if he could talk to me. He told me he had a 15-year-old daughter and he thought What Kind of Girl (Do You think I Am?)' was the greatest message song ever on record. But radio stations would can a song, then it would become a hit, then they'd start playing it.

A similar thing happened with Lynn's latest CD. In 2004 she teamed with Jack White, then of the alt-rock duo White Stripes, to record Van Lear Rose. Commercial country radio practically ignored the disc, but it was embraced by Americana stations and fans of real country music. Van Lear Rose won two Grammys in 2005, including best country album.

Jack White moved to Nashville. He's going to record one of my songs. You know which one? Rated X.' It's not dirty, Lynn said, laughing uproariously before singing two verses. I don't know how I remembered that.Lynn is at work on three new albums a religious album, a Christmas disc and an album of new material. In concert, listen for Lynn to remember as many songs as possible.

She works with an eight-piece band. Three of her kids, daughters Patsy and Peggy, who work as The Lynns, and son Ernest, are part of the show.

I just get on stage and try to sing the songs the people want to hear. I'll sing a few and then ask the audience if there's anything they want to hear. They all holler and I can't understand a word, she said, laughing. Then I say, OK, this side.' And they all holler. It's fun.

When you can't have fun with a show, quit. I want to do what the people want to hear. They paid to come in the front door. I snuck in through the back. If I have to stand on my head and wiggle my toes to make them happy, I will.

It probably won't come to that. But don't bet against Loretta Lynn accomplishing that feat if she needs to.

Loretta Lynn still country music crowd pleaser after 50 years in country music

Loretta Lynn has been performing live concerts all over the world for more than 50 years and she is still dubbed country musics sweetheart.

Loretta Lynn was born Loretta Webb in 1935 and has been one of the leading ladies of country music since the 1960s.

In 1976 Loretta Lynn;s biography became a hit Academy Award winning movie that starred actress Sissy Spacek in the lead and very convincing performance of Loretta  along side of actor Tommy Lee Jones who played Lorettas husband Doolittle Lynn.

Loretta was the second of eight children who grew up in Butcher Holler Kentucky a place that is near and dear to Lorettas heart and can be found mentioned in a number of Lorettas hit songs. Butcher Holler which is a section of the Van Lear mining community is near Paintsville in Johnson County Kentucky.

Loretta met and married Doolittle Lynn when she was only thirteen years old and began immediately having children ,by the time Loretta was 19 she had four small children to take care of, and a few years later also gave birth to a set of identical twin girls.

When Loretta Lynn was 24 years old Doolittle bought her a guitar for an anniversary present which she taught herself to play. By 1960 Loretta begin playing in small clubs and went onto record hit record Im a Honky Tonk Girl.

SEE LORETTA LYNN SLIDE SHOW HERE.

In 1967 Loretta Lynn had he first #1 hit  with the still very popular country music crowd pleaser Dont Come Home A Drinkin she followed up that hit with her next a song she wrote about the women she believed that her husband Doolittle fooled around with on the side called You Aint Woman Enough .

In 1971 Loretta teamed up with country crooner Conway Twitty and had a number of hits singing as a duet that has been said to have reached a type of musical chemistry between the two that has yet to be found by any others.

CHECK OUT THE GREAT LORETTA LYNN VIDEOS BY CLICKING HERE>

Loretta Lynn has slowed down considerably with her live concert performances, but still plays to a sold out crowd everytime she does perform .Loretta Lynn owns a huge ranch in Hurricane Mills Tennessee which is listed as the 7th largest attraction in the state of Tennessee.

Loretta Lynn speaks fondly of her lifes memories and even laughs when she speaks of her late husband Doolittle Lynn  who passed away in 1996 by saying with a smile He never hit me one time that I didnt hit him back twice.

City Guide Nashville

NASHVILLE, Tennessee, the state's capital and home of country music, is the obvious venue for the music genre's biggest hoe-down, held over four days every June. The Country Music Association takes over downtown Music City and brings together top acts, along with the hungriest wannabes for a huge celebration of all things country that sees the city awash with Stetsons and cowboy boots.Country legend Loretta Lynn once said: "When I first came to Nashville, people hardly gave country music any respect. We lived in old cars and dirty hotels, and we ate when we could." Go now and see how times have changed. Going for 85 years, The Grand Ole Opry (www.opry.com) is a Nashville must. Every Tuesday, Friday and Saturday night, you can catch the show that made country music famous as it visits various venues across the city, or visit its original home at the famous Ryman Auditorium (116 Fifth Ave North), where stars such as Hank Williams and Patsy Cline started their country careers.

RADIO SHOW Words to the Wise: with Loretta Lynn

This week on American Routes we're sharing some words of wisdom. Loretta Lynn blazed a trail through the male-dominated world of country music, bringing her experience as a mother and wife to songwriting and challenging stereotypes along the way. We'll hear about her journey from the hills of Butcher Hollow to the studios of Music City. you might have to click on LORETTA'S NAME when the Radio  box comes up if not search for Loretta Lynn here is the link. http://americanroutes.publicradio.org/player/show/640/hour/2

They Can ACT but can the Sing You Bet

Sissy Spacek and Beverly DAngelo - Coal Miners Daughter (1980) in the TOP 10

Following in Liza Minnellis footsteps, Sissy Spacek picked up a Best Actress Oscar for her role as country legend Loretta Lynn in Coal Miners Daughter. The movie illustrates Spaceks long, painful rise from poverty, hardship and marriage at 13 to the top of the country charts and superstardom. Spacek was astounding in both her acting and singing, fully channeling Lynn at every turn. Beverly DAngelo was equally fine as the iconic Patsy Cline. This is arguably one of the finest musical biopics ever set to celluloid.

Loretta's Muppet Apperance in the top five picks

And now lets get things started
Why dont you get things started
Its time to get things started
On the most sensational inspirational celebrational Muppetational
This is what we call the Muppet Show!

Dont deny it. You were singing along just now

Kermit taught us that its not easy being green. Or in Gonzos case, blue. For five years, beginning in 1976, little felt characters brought us as much laughter and entertainment as anything else on television. For 120 episodes, Fozzie the Bear, Miss Piggy, Scooter, Rowlf, Beaker, Sam the Eagle, Animal and various friends did everything they could do to make life hell for Statler and Waldorf.

But along the way during this beloved show, a series of guest starsmost notably country music guest starssang alongside Jim Hensons family doing originals and parodies of their biggest hits. It was a veritable whos who of big names in country music. Names like Linda Ronstadt, Kris Kristofferson, Crystal Gayle, Anne Murray, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans appeared in various episodes. Even Waylon Jennings did a duet with Big Bird in a non-Muppets Show movie Follow That Bird. John Denver appeared in two exclusive Muppets specials (John Denver & the Muppets: A Christmas Together and John Denver & the Muppets: Rocky Mountain Holiday.) Without further ado, heres a Friday Five of great appearances by country music artists on The Muppet Show

#3. Ones On The Way Loretta Lynn (Season 3, Episode 56)

In one of the funnier Muppet Show scenes ever, the Country Music Hall of Famer Loretta Lynn sings Ones On The Way with what seems like a dozen little realistic human baby Muppets that cant stay out of the way. The kids whacking each other with baby toys is really darn funny. 


Loretta Lynn Ranch RE-OPENS


LORETTA LYNN RANCH NOW OPEN

Loretta Lynn's Ranch has completed clean up from the flood and is now in full operation. Tours, museums, all retail, and RV park are now open for daily business from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, 7 days per week. For more information please call the ranch office at 931-296-7700.

Loretta Lynn's Ranch Closes

http://www.lorettalynn.com/news/

RANCH CLOSES DUE TO FLOOD

Loretta Lynn's Ranch was damaged by the 2010 Flood of TN this May. As the repair progress is concerned, they are slowly putting things back together. Repair and dozer crews have been working 12 hours a day since the flood to cleanup and repair the damage so that the ranch can open back up. Damages are mainly directed to the property itself, the road to the Western Town area has been completely washed away so there is no access to the shops tours or museums, this has caused the entire ranch to shut down till further notice. Loretta and her family are doing great and look forward to the ranch opening up as soon as possible. Please check back here or call the ranch office at 931-296-7700 for the reopening dates

Cookbook Mania! Youre Cookin it Country

by undercover caterer on May 17, 2010

Yeah, thats right. Ive got Loretta Lynns cookbook. How could I resist her smiling face and long luxurious hair, beckoning me from the shelf at J. Crawfords Bookstore?  Besides, Ive always wanted to cook it country, so why not learn from a country music legend?

Now, I learned to make chicken-fried steak from my Uncle Woody when I was a teenager.  This recipe is different, but also quite good.  The crust is thick and crunchy!

First, set up your breading station.  One dish with evaporated milk and eggs, and another with the flour.  I seasoned the flour with Colmans dry mustard, Lawrys seasoned salt and some cayenne.  Loretta doesnt.  You can do it however you wish.

Melt shortening in a cast iron pan.  Loretta specifies using a cast iron skillet here.

First dip the cube steaks into the milk mixture.

Both sides!  Sorry these pictures are so crappy.

Then dip them into the flour, making sure they are coated on both sides.  Knock off the excess.

Fry them, two at a time, until they are golden brown on each side.  Loretta tells you to add salt and pepper to taste when they are done.

Man, this picture is terrible.  Add a bit of the seasoned flour to the drippings in the pan, letting cook for a couple of minutes to cook the flour.  Add the sweet milk and stir until the gravy thickens.

Pour the gravy over the steaks and serve with mashed potatoes.

Garnish with some sliced green onions or chives.

Dig in, what are you waiting for?

********************************************

Loretta Lynns  Chicken Fried Steak with Gravy

For Chicken:

1 16-oz. can evaporated milk

1 egg

2 lbs. minute or cube steak

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 Tbsp shortening

salt and pepper to taste

(1 Tbsp Colmans dry mustard, 1 tsp Lawrys seasoned salt, 1/2 tsp cayenne pepperoptional)

..

In a medium-size bowl mix the evaporated milk and egg together.  Dip the steaks one at a time in the egg mixture and then in the flour (or seasoned flour, if you prefer).  Melt the shortening in an iron skillet or frying pan over medium heat.  Fry the steaks until each side is golden brown.  Add salt and pepper to taste.  Remove the steaks from the skillet, reserving 2/3 cup of drippings.

For Gravy:

2/3 cup steak drippings

1-1/2 Tbsp flour (or seasoned flour, if you prefer)

1 cup sweet milk

..

For the gravy, mix the reserved drippings with the flour in a small saucepan (its easier to use the same skillet you used for the steaksthe gravy will taste better, too).  Simmer over medium heat.  Add the sweet milk and stir until the gravy thickens.  Pour over the steak and serve with mashed potatoes.

Loretta says You cant go wrong!

FOX NEWS Loretta Lynn Loses Ranch to Flooding

Historic Nashville entertainment venues were also heavily damaged in the flood.

The Grand Ole Opry House, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, lower Broadway honky tonks, and even legendary homesteads received flooding.

Loretta Lynn's ranch, an hour west of Nashville was also impacted.

The office manager at the ranch tells us the roads are barricaded and no one is allowed into the town of Hurricane Mills.

As of now they are unsure how long the legendary property will remain that way. ALL CONCERTS FOR THE SUMMER ARE CANCELED  FOR THE TIME BEING

Hurricane Mills Loretta Lynn Ranch FLOODED

Historic bridge in Hurricane Mills Tn wiped out and gone
Owner of Hurricane Mills and the Loretta Lynn Ranch music Icon Loretta Lynn have been hit hard with the flooding waters of Tennessee Loretta and her family are safe and sound even though her western town has been hit hard the waters have even rip out the historic bridge that Lynn Purchased from Humphreys County the bridge was used in movies and video's over the years the area has been under 28 feet of water since late Friday Evening waters have started receding as of late Sunday night.

Statement as of 9:28 PM CDT on May 03, 2010


... Flood Warning extended until 05/06 11:17... the Flood Warning continues for
the Duck River near Hurricane Mills
* until 05/06 11:17.
* At 11am Sunday the stage was 28.7 feet.
* Major flooding is occurring and record flooding is forecast.
* Flood stage is 24.0 feet.
* The river will continue rising to near 33.0 feet by tomorrow early afternoon.
The river will fall below flood stage Thursday morning.
* At 28.0 feet... roads along the river are flooded including Hurricane Creek
Road west of Hurricane Mills... Tumbling Creek Road east of Highway 13... and
portions of Dyer Road near Taylortown. Extensive flooding of agricultural land
along the river is occurring from Bucksnort... to Taylortown and Cedar Grove.
* At 26.0 feet... portions of Hurricane Creek Road west of Hurricane Mills are
flooded and may be impassable... and flood waters approach Watered Hollow Road
west of Highway 13.
* At 24.0 feet... flood waters approach low lying portions of Hurricane Creek
Road near Hurricane Mills... and other roads in the area are flooded including
Tumbling Creek Road. Agricultural land along the river is extensively flooded
from Bucksnort... to Taylortown and Cedar Grove.
* At 22.0 feet... portions of Tumbling Creek Road east of Highway 13 are flooded 

Literary libations from Loretta Lynn's Ranch

This week, Hartford Books Examiner will be reporting live on location from the South. Today's destination: Hurricane Mills, Tennessee.

***

Loretta Lynn

Howdy, yall! Today, Hartford Books Examiner is writing to you from Loretta Lynns Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee.

The undisputed queen of country music, Loretta Lynn has recorded 52 top-ten songs and charted 16 number-one singles in a career that has spanned more than four decades. Her autobiography, Coal Miners Daughter, sold over one million copies and was made into an Academy Award-winning film. A member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, Lynn was recognized as a Kennedy Center Honoree in 2003. She is the mother of six children and still lives in Hurricane Mills.

Loretta Lynns Ranch is a tourist destination that is sure to delight fans and first-timers alike. Open April thru October from 9:00AM 5:00PM daily, attractions include the Plantation Home Tour, which encompasses the plantation home, simulated coal mine, and Butcher Holler home place for $12 per person ($6 for children between the ages of 6 12) and the Coal Miners Daughter Museum at the cost of $10 per person. Free attractions include Lorettas Frontier Homestead, Grist Mill Museum, Native American Artifact Museum, and Lorettas Fan & Doll Museum. There are also a variety of shops and snack stands that visitors will enjoy.

Lady Loretta Boutique & Collectibles is run by Rosie Hamilton, a dear friend of Lorettas for nearly forty years, and offers a wide variety of specialty itemsmost of which have been signed by the country legend herself. In addition to boasting an assortment of very reasonably priced autographed photos, postcards, posters, CDs and objects owned by Lynn (such as jewelry, ornaments and dishware), there are several items that will be of interest to the bibliophile. These include the out-of-print Loretta Lynns Story Songbook, the Color Me Country Coloring Book, and the Ranch Book The Cinderella Story. The boutique also used to sell copies of the singers two New York Times bestselling memoirs, Coal Miners Daughter (1976) and Still Woman Enough (2002).Loretta Lynn's Ranch

In 2004, Loretta released Youre Cookin It Country, which features 129 recipes interspersed with personal photographs and memories. And while the book has become scarce and is no longer in-print, the boutique does carry a stock of signed editions that sell for $24.99a heck of a deal when you consider that new, unsigned copies start at the price of $54.30 from sellers listing on Amazon.com. If you call Rosie at 931-296-9774, she may just be able to hook you up

From the publisher:

In You're Cookin' It Country, Loretta Lynn shares over 120 of her favorite recipes. From the dishes her mother cooked as she was growing up to the meals she has prepared for her family over the years. Also included are more than 35 stories relating to food as only Loretta can tell them. These include stories of her Mommy going out hunting for rabbit and possum to the more recent story of Jack White of the rock group The White Stripes flying to Nashville to have a dinner of chicken and dumplings with Loretta. There is also the story of her husband to be, Doolittle, buying a pie from her at an auction only to discover that Loretta had mistaken salt for the sugar when she baked it.

You're Cookin' It Country will be a must have purchase for the millions of fans Loretta has made all over the world.

Connecticut fans: Loretta Lynn will be playing the Warner Theatre in Torrington on September 17 at 8PM!  You can purchased tickets here.

Thats all from the ranch, folks. And remember: when youre looking at Loretta, youre looking at country!

Adventures in Feministory: The Pill by Loretta Lynn

by Kelsey Wallace:

Full disclosure: I love Loretta Lynn. I have dressed like her for Halloween. I have sat glued to Sissy Spacek's performance as her in Coal Miner's Daughter. I have been known to sing "You Ain't Woman Enough" at various karaoke bars in the greater Portland area. I am a fan. But! Even if I weren't a fan of her music, her awesome biopic and her sassy Grand Ole Opry getups, I'd be a fan of her feminism.

Not only was Lynn (born Loretta Webb, in 1935) one of the very first women to have a successful solo career in country music, she is also known for challenging the status quo with her music, often by singing songs of a very personal nature. For instance, she has been very open about her humble beginnings as a coal miner's daughter (you knew she wrote a song about it, right?) growing up in the hills of Kentucky. Though this is a background that many people might be quick to stereotype (the term hillbilly is not exactly one of endearment) Lynn has always been proud of her roots and thus has defied commonly held notions of what it means to be a "country woman."

Sure, some feminists might dismiss Lynn's songs about domestic life (e.g., "One's on the Way", which btw was written by Shel Silverstein! Thanks, Wikipedia) as not really pushing a progressive feminist agenda, but Lynn's songs about childrearing and married life highlight subjects and give voice to (primarily women's) issues that are rarely talked about on the Billboard Charts, even to this day. To me, she has always been a pioneer when it comes to celebrating the often unsung experiences of many women. Lynn got married at 13 and had four children by the time she was 19 (she had two more children later in life), and though I personally can't relate to her story or her songs about it I can imagine there have been many women over the years who have (and they are great songs, of course).

But, if that isn't quite enough to sell you on Loretta Lynn, Feminist Icon, did you know she wrote a hit (and censored) song about birth control? It's true!

"The Pill" is considered the first major song to mention oral contraceptives, and in a 1975 interview with Playgirl (yeah, I guess she did an interview with Playgirl) Lynn says she was congratulated after the song's success by a number rural physicians who told her that "The Pill" did a great deal to highlight the availability of birth control in isolated, rural areas. Way to go, Van Lear Rose!

Of course, one thing about Loretta Lynn that makes her especially kickass is that she is still a smokin' hot country lady performer at age 75. Do you remember this video from a few years ago? As a Portland native, I couldn't have been prouder:

How awesome is it that Lynn is wearing her Grand Ole Opry gear and flirting up a storm with Jack White in this video? I love that she defies the notion that an older woman can't be sexy, and she does it in a classy, fun, totally non-"cougar" way (I won't name names, but there are some older musicians out there who could take a page from the Loretta Lynn Classy Handbook).

So if you've got a little extra time today, start your week off right with some Loretta Lynn. She's been speaking out and speaking up for decades now about childbirth, relationships, birth control, honky tonks, domestic life, coal mining, and more and if we're lucky she won't quit anytime soon.

Note: I couldn't quite work it into this post because I haven't read it, but were you aware that Loretta Lynn (in addition to penning two autobiographies) wrote an autobiographical cookbook? Someone buy me a copy of You're Cookin' It Country, please. I want to learn to make "lemon whippersnappers"!

Adventures in Feministory: One's on the way by Loretta Lynn

By Suka:

I love her so much. The song 'The Pill' is great, but I would argue that 'One's on the way' has feminist tendencies. After descriptions of her hectic household: baby needs changing, laundry needs to be done, coffee's boiling overher husband calls from the bar. He tells her he's bringing a few army buddies home and when she asks him to pick up some items from the grocery store on the way, the line has already gone dead.

"Darn, there goes the phone
Hello honey, what's that you say?
You're bringin' a few old army buddies home?
You're callin' from a bar?
Get away from there! No, not you honey
I was talkin' to the baby
Wait a minute, honey, the door bell
Honey, could you stop at the market and...hello?, hello?"

I think she's using the song to point out the lopsided partnership she's insomething a lot of women could probably relate to. I suppose she doesn't make a point of saying she's leaving him (that's in tons of other songs), but stillI think she put that in there consciously to criticize the unequal division of labor.

Sure, she ends the song on this note:

"The girls in New York City, they all march for women's lib
And better homes and garden shows, the modern way to live
And the pill may change the world tomorrow, but meanwhile, today
Here in Topeka, the flies are a buzzin'
The dog is a barkin' and the floor needs a scrubbin'
One needs a spankin' and one needs a huggin'
Lord, one's on the way"

But isn't she just saying many women, while perhaps wanting to, have a hard time participating in this movement or that metropolitan lifestyle due to time and money limitations?

George Jone Enjoyed Tour with Loretta and Conway

Q. | With whom have your toured that etched the greatest memories for you?

A. | I have toured with so many people that would be hard to say, but I really enjoyed touring with Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn. He would bring the house down when the big mirror ball lit up and he said "Hello Darlin'."

Lynn and Haggard set to record

Ask just about any young country artist on the scene today to name their influences, and they are quick to acknowledge the artistry of Merle Haggard. The 73-year-old icon demonstrates he's still the master on 'I Am What I Am,' his first album on Vanguard Records. When asked what he does these days for fun, Merle says, "I used to be a really good golfer and really good bass fisherman, I don't do much of either one anymore. I kind of talk a good game."

He and Theresa are working on an album together. "It's our tribute to Johnny and June. That's what we're making right now," he says. Merle is also set to record with Loretta Lynn. "I'm kind of waiting for her to call me and tell me which way to jump," he laughs.

Call for Papers - Performer Spotlight: Sissy Spacek

We are pleased to announce that after the very successful launch of our Director Spotlight last year (featuring Pedro Almodovar), PopMatters will be publishing its first ever Performance Spotlight on one of the most amazing actresses of our time, the legendary Sissy Spacek.


Spacek, in case you have been living under a rock, is a six-time Oscar nominated actress who won the award for Best Actress for her work as Loretta Lynn in 1980s Coal Miners Daughter, in which she sang all of Lynns songs herself. We have decided that with her upcoming performance opposite Robert Duvall in Get Low, her recent turn as a powerful lobbyist on HBOs Big Love, and her upcoming network series debut in a new medical drama for CBS, that it is the right time for a serious revisiting of her overall body of work, with PopMatters usual academic, engaging, laser-beam focus.


We are looking for some fairly specific pieces of writing from interested writers. Each day of the series will look at a different decade of Spaceks performances, their themes, her co-stars and collaborators, the critical reaction to her films and performances, and just about everything in between.


We are seeking nuanced, thoughtful, creative pieces that are heavy on original, scholarly analysis. If you are interested in writing about a single film, rather than a decade, we can perhaps work that out, but we encourage you, if you have an interest in participating in the series, to take this opportunity to challenge yourself to explore this essential actresses canon and tell us about your experience!


For the Monday 70s feature it will be mandatory to focus in depth on Spaceks work with some of the major auteurs of the decade in the following films: Badlands, Carrie, 3 Women.


In the 80s piece on Tuesday the following films must be considered, as well as Spaceks abrupt exit from leading roles in film mid-decade: Coal Miners Daughter, Raggedy Man, Missing, Crimes of the Heart and night Mother.


Wednesday will bring the 90s essay, which should critically engage Spacek as an activist and supporting actress and the writer should be familiar with the following films and include them in the conversation: The Long Walk Home, JFK, A Place for Annie (TV movie) The Grass Harp, If These Walls Could Talk, Affliction and The Straight Story.


In the Thursday piece that corresponds Spaceks last decade of work, the essay will focus on the concepts of aging, the kind of roles available to Spacek and her contemporaries, and how the actress shockingly changed the publics perception of her as a performer with her revelatory characterization of Ruth Fowler in In the Bedroom.


You are cordially invited to participate in PopMatters first-ever Performer Spotlight on Sissy Spacek, a sure-to-be exciting look at one of film historys most interesting women. Strict adherence to the due dates is non-negotiable because of a tight publishing schedule please do not commit to writing if you cant make the deadlines, this makes things very tough on the sites editors who are juggling a lot of content.

Loretta's Happy Birthday Song in USA TOP FIVE SONGS

As some of you already know, today is my birthday. My plans are pretty low-key, though there will be cake, and I might ditch work after lunch to go to the movies. (Don't tell my boss.)

Before any of that, though, let me share today's Pop Five, written by yours truly -- it's a list of my favorite birthday tunes. And yes, all of these songs are kind of old. But who cares? So am I!

My Pop Five Songs About Birthdays:

5. What Are We Gonna Do?, Dramarama -- OK, so it's actually an Earth Day song, not a birthday song ... but I can't help but adore a track that references the day I was born. I like to think John Easdale wrote the opening lines just for me: "It's April 21st, and everybody knows today is Earth Day/Merry Christmas, happy birthday to whoever's being born."

4. Happy Birthday to Me, Cracker -- "I'm feeling thankful for the small things today," David Lowry sings on this upbeat ditty from the band's '92 debut. That's good advice anytime, but particularly as one ages another year.

3. Birthday, The Sugarcubes -- This sparkling single (off 1988's Life's Too Good) is the track that sparked my decades-long appreciation of Bjork.

2. Happy Birthday, Loretta Lynn -- Poor Loretta has been done wrong again on this one, and she refuses to stick around for her mate's special day. If I were him, I'd still be crying.

1. Unhappy Birthday, The Smiths -- Why does the cruelest birthday song make me feel so very happy? Morrissey is in glorious form here, telling the birthday person he/she is "evil and you lie and if you should die/I may feel slightly sad but I won't cry." Something tells me they'd forgive him anyway.

Do you have a Pop Five list you'd like to share? Send it my way at popcandy@usatoday.com with your name and city. Look for it on the blog!

Singer Eilen Jewell chats and charms at Tin Angel

On the whole, the fine art of stage banter is downright scarce in today's popular music - a shame. Eilen Jewell, the Boston-based singer-songwriter and tune-interpreter working freely across the wide realms of folk, country, blues, and rock and roll, is one performer who doesn't pass up such opportunity.

Throughout Friday's set with her seasoned three-piece band at the Tin Angel, she took the time to connect with the crowd and set up songs - worthy endeavors that also helped establish the Idaho native's unique, low-key charm, bringing even her own talkativeness into her musing.

After she announced her second top-notch Loretta Lynn cover of the evening, "Who Says God Is Dead!" (Jewell also sang Lynn's "The Darkest Day"), it was welcome news to learn that she and the band had just recorded it for their Lynn-tribute side project, Butcher Holler, an album due soon.

Billboard Chart Beat Loretta enters #44

MINING ANOTHER HIT: George Strait isn't the only country legend making chart headlines this week.

While the King of Country notches a top 10 on Country Songs in a record 30th consecutive year, as "I Gotta Get to You" zips 12-9, Loretta Lynn adds to her legacy with a debut on Country Albums. The singer - who celebrated her 75th birthday yesterday - returns to the list after four years and 10 months, as "50th Anniversary Collection" debuts at No. 44. She had last appeared with the No. 2-peaking "Van Lear Rose," produced by the White Stripes' Jack White, in 2004-05.

The new retrospective expands Lynn's career span on the chart to 46 years, three months and one week, dating to Jan. 18, 1964, the tally's second week of existence.

An appearance on the first Country Albums chart is enough to give Johnny Cash a one-week lead over Lynn for longest span on the survey. Cash appears at No. 15 this week with "American VI: Ain't No Grave." He inaugurated the chart when "Ring of Fire (The Best of Johnny Cash)" led the maiden list dated Jan. 11, 1964.

"50th Anniversary Collection" marks Lynn's 59th entry on Country Albums, a sum that includes 12 duet albums with Conway Twitty, four sets with Ernest Tubb and one with Dolly Parton and Tammy Wynette. Among women, only Parton has made more visits to the chart, having tallied 76 charted titles.

The new set commemorates the golden anniversary of Lynn's first visit to Country Songs. "I'm a Honky Tonk Girl" entered the then-30-position list at No. 28 on June 13, 1960, eventually peaking at No. 14.

As she won a new generation of fans by collaborating with White, Lynn is an esteemed member of the 2010 Lilith Tour lineup. "I'm happy they wanted me. I have never done shows just with other girl singers before," says Lynn.

"When I first started out, they said girl singers couldn't sell records or concert tickets. We've come a long way since then, and we're gonna have a big time out there!"

Lime Wire Birthday Beat

2010 marks 50 years since Loretta Lynns first single Im A Honky Tonk Girl hit the charts. Tomorrow the legendary lady from Butcher Hollow, KY will celebrate her 75th birthday. At an age when many artists are slowing down, the same cant be said for Loretta Lynn. Shes got not one, but two albums coming out soon. Shes signed up to join the Lilith Fair tour this year, and Sony Music will be releasing a multi-genre salute to her music later this year. With all of that said, LimeWire Music Blog takes a look at 12 moments that helped to shape the career of this country music legend!

  1. January 1948
    She wasnt even 13 yet, but young Loretta Webb took the hand of Oliver Lynn. It would be Oliver, also known as Mooney or Doolittle, that would influence the majority of her songs. Though their relationship, particularly early on, was stormy, make no mistake about it, were it not for his pushing her and encouraging her, Loretta Lynn might very well never have become the household name that she became.
  2. February 1960
    Lynn signed with Washington-based record label Zero Records. Her first release was a self-written song, Im A Honky Tonk Girl. Thanks to a relentless radio tour orchestrated by Loretta and Mooney themselves, the song hit #14 on the Billboard charts. It was the first of nearly three decades worth of radio hits.
  3. September 1961
    After making the move to Nashville, Lynn signs with Owen Bradley and country giant Decca Records. Her first single for the label, I Walked Away From The Wreck, fails to chart, but her next record, Success, climbs all the way to #6 becoming her first top ten record.
  4. March 1963
  5. Nobody in Nashville took more of an interest in Lynns career than Patsy Cline, and her death in a tragic plane crash took away a very important mentor. One of Lynns recording highlights would come some 14 years later when she released an album of Cline standards, I Remember Patsy.
  6. October 1969
    Already one of the formats top stars, Lynn records the song that will become her theme, Coal Miners Daughter, which was also the title of a well-received 1975 book and movie of the same name. The song originally contained over 12 verses, but producer Owen Bradley encouraged Lynn to cut the song down a little, which she did.
  7. November 1970
    Loretta had been a fan of Conway Twitty since his rock n roll days. When Twitty signed with Decca in 1965, nobody was more happier to have him as a labelmate than Lynn. The two lobbied Bradley to allow them to record together, but Bradley didnt want to see the two record and they split up bitterly. They won the battle, and proved Bradley wrong. The two recorded together until the early 1980s, later reuniting for a 1988 album and tour.
  8. October 1972
    Loretta made history at the Sixth Annual Country Music Association Awards, taking home Vocal Duet (with Twitty), as well as Female Vocalist of The Year, and Entertainer of The Yeara first for a female vocalist at the awards.
  9. March 1980
    Many country artists have released successful books, but considerably fewer have seen their lives on the big screen. In the spring of 1980, Loretta joined the exclusive club with the release of Coal Miners Daughter, the theatrical version of her song and book. It still stands as one of the best musicals, and netted Sissy Spacek an Oscar for her role as Lynn, and should have done the same for Tommy Lee Jones for his unforgettable portrayal of Mooney.
  10. October 1988
    Loretta always had a unique way of expressing herself, and her reaction to being named to the Country Music Hall of Fame was classic: She jumped right into presenter Johnny Cashs arms.
  11. August 1996
    It had been a long and painful road for the Lynns with the declining health of Mooney, as he succumbed to diabetes and various other ailments at the age of 69. Loretta got away from the public eye for a while, but returned in the fall of 2000 with her Still Country disc. It contained the stunning tearjerker I Cant Hear The Music, written about Mooney.
  12. April 2004
    In the new millennium, legends like Johnny Cash had breathed life into their career by recording with unlikely producers such as Rick Rubin. For her Interscope release, Van Lear Rose, Loretta turned to longtime fan and admirer Jack White to serve as producer, and the result was a well-deserved 2005 Grammy for Best Country Album.

Country & Western Song of the Week

*Country & Western Song of the Week: Portland, Oregon by Jack White and Loretta Lynn. 
 
*The Minnesota State Senate is considering a proposal to lift the total alcohol ban at TCF Bank Stadium.  Generally I would fully support a proposal like this.  I helped pay for the stadium, so I should be able to legally drink a beer there as long as I do it responsibly.  Individual liberty, backed by personal responsibility, are the fundamental values of America.  Unfortunately we all know who is supporting the proposal and what their intentions are.  If the proposal is passed, alcohol sales and service will be limited to the premium seats in TCF Bank Stadium and the proletariat will remain dry.  I cannot support that.  Flat overpriced beer for all, or for none.
 
Your thoughts on the Beavers, Target Field, how the Mauer contract affects the farm system, Portland Oregon, and the TCF Bank Stadium proposal are welcome in the comments.

Larry Gatlin Makes a classic move

By Tom Roland:
 Larry hosted the first Classics show a year ago, and he was greeted back with open arms by one rather prominent guest. Our spotlight artist that night was Loretta [Lynn], Larry recalls. After the show, she came over to me and I hugged her and told her how wonderful it was to see her. She said, I heard a rumor that you were movin back to town. I said, Well, yes mam, Im gonna come back part-time. I have an apartment here. She said, I was so mad at you when you went away. Come back. We need you. Well, that was sweet. That was wonderful to think that this icon, this legend of our business, thinks that country music could use the Gatlin boys and my songs and our music.

Honky tonk legend Loretta Lynn keeps the country real

By Daniel Durchholz
It's been 50 years since Loretta Lynn scored a hit with her very first recording, "I'm a Honky Tonk Girl." Reminded of the years gone by, the country superstar seems impressed by her own longevity as she should be
"Ain't that something?" Lynn says by phone from her home outside Nashville. "I couldn't believe it when they told me how long it's been." Looking back on her hardscrabble beginnings, which found her driving with her husband, Oliver "Doolittle" Lynn, from one radio station to another to promote her record, Lynn says, "That's probably when I had my best time, going from station to station. Now it's way different. That kind of thing wouldn't happen today." Lynn's remarkable career has included numerous No. 1 hits, including "Coal Miner's Daughter" (which was also the name of her 1980 Academy Award-winning biopic), "Fist City," "One's on the Way," "Don't Come Home a Drinkin' (With Lovin' on Your Mind)," and "She's Got You." Other major hits include "You're Lookin' at Country" and "The Pill."Many of those songs, as well as others in her catalog, are gritty, tough-talking anthems that dealt with real-life situations in a frank manner, causing Lynn to be praised or vilified, depending on your point of view as a trailblazing feminist."'One's on the Way' and 'The Pill,' are the ones that gave me the most trouble," she says. "You wouldn't think so, 'cause everyone out there was having babies one after the other. But then (birth control pills) came out and I wrote the song. And then everybody was taking the pill, so why should they raise the devil about it?" Lynn raised some eyebrows in Nashville again in 2004 when she let rock guitarist Jack White produce her most recent album, "Van Lear Rose." But the album won two Grammy Awards, including best country album, and became the biggest seller of her careerThe lesson, she says, is that artists need to return to real country music"My stuff is country," she says. "Even when I'm recording with Jack White." In addition to her current tour, which brings her to Rickman Auditorium in Arnold on Saturday, Lynn's schedule this year will find her playing some dates on the Lilith Fair tour which is wholly appropriate for someone whose songs have made her an icon of female empowerment.Lynn is also working on a variety of recording projects, including a duets album with various female pop and country singers, a religious album and a Christmas album. One thing that is not on her schedule, though, is retirement.  "I believe in work," she says. "I always have. I didn't like washing dishes when I was coming up, and I'd get whipped, so I would do it. But now, I don't mind work."

America Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Country Great LORETTA LYNN

America Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Country Great Loretta Lynn's Debut Charting Single With Albums and More During Yearlong Celebration

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Marking the 50th anniversary of her first charting single--1960's "I'm A Honky Tonk Girl"--country music great Loretta Lynn received a prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award on this year's January 31st Grammy broadcast.  That honor will serve as just the beginning of a yearlong celebration of her extraordinary legacy, not only in country music (16 #1 singles among 51 Top 10s) but in American popular culture.

Growing up in Butcher Holler, Kentucky, Lynn had four of her six children before she was 18 and was a grandmother by 29.  Yet the coalminer's daughter became the Queen of Country.  She has sung some of the most popular country songs ever recorded and also some of the most controversial.  

Lynn was the first woman inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, the first female country artist to have a gold album--titled after her first #1 single, "Don't Come Home A-Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind)"--and the first woman named the Country Music Association's Entertainer of the Year.  The inspiring tale of her life, Coal Miner's Daughter, became a 1976 best-seller.  Four years later, the movie version earned seven Oscar nominations, with Sissy Spacek's portrayal of Lynn winning for Best Actress.  Ladies Home Journal once listed Lynn among the world's 10 most admired women, alongside the likes of Mother Teresa and Jackie Kennedy.  In 1988, she was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame; her autobiographical "Coal Miner's Daughter" was honored by National Public Radio in 2000 as one of the "100 most important American musical works of the 20th century"; and in 2003 she was awarded a Kennedy Center Honor.  

Her '60s hits such as "Blue Kentucky Girl," "Fist City," "You Ain't Woman Enough" and "You've Just Stepped In (From Stepping Out On Me)" presaged even greater success in the '70s, with "Coal Miner's Daughter," "You're Looking At Country," "One's On The Way," "Somebody Somewhere (Don't Know What He's Missin' Tonight)" and "Trouble In Paradise."  She didn't shy away from controversy either.  "The Pill," her look at birth control from a female perspective in 1975, was applauded by the women's movement while some country radio stations boycotted the song.  

Impressively, her partnership with Conway Twitty created the greatest male-female duo in country history even as she was solely nominated as CMA Female Vocalist of the Year every year but three from 1967-1981.  For 12 consecutive years, 1971-1982, Twitty and Lynn were nominated as Vocal Duo of the Year by the CMA and won every year from 1972-1975.  Five of their collaborations hit #1: "After The Fire Is Gone," "Lead Me On," "Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man," "As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone" and "Feelins'."  

Today, Loretta Lynn continues to perform and record, 50 years after she first broke onto the charts as a honky-tonk girl.

During the year, special album releases, along with television programming, are expected, with details to be announced as they become available. 

Loretta Gets Lifetime Grammy


Lynn was tending to a sick family member and was unable to attend. Daughters Patsy and Peggy Lynn represented her. "Peggy and I always said she didn't open doors, she kicked them off the hinges," Patsy said. "This is her 50th year in country music, and it couldn't have gotten started any better."

Academy president Neil Portnow called Lynns voice Candid, vulnerable and defiant.

Bradley was part of many of Lynns records

Loretta Featured in Freedom Hall Book


Will be  Released Feb 16th 54 years at Freedom Hall   Book and will feature Loretta
The Concerts for All Musical Tastes chapter is terrific, featuring photographs and stories that remind one of some of the great musical acts that have played this enormous hall. Reed includes some great stories from his days covering the venue: The tale about Loretta Lynn proves especially fascinating, as does the one about Elvis and the author's wife.

Grammys get it right:

Lynn to get lifetime achievement

It's way past time for Kentucky icon



 When Van Lear Rose won a Grammy for best country album in 2005, she offered the following nugget in her acceptance speech:The main thing about country music is, I love to sing it, said the native of Butcher Hollow, Ky. And there's a lot of people who love to hear country music.

You could write that off as an empty sound bite, but it actually speaks directly to the phenomenal longevity of Lynn's career.

For 50 years, as she has traveled from coal miner's daughter to superstar to icon, Lynn has always kept things pure and simple. She sings honestly about everyday problems rutting husbands and sticky-fingered women while maintaining a decades-long conversation with fans.At this weekend's ceremonies in Los Angeles for the 52nd annual Grammy Awards, the 75-year-old Lynn is being honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award. It's about time. The Grammys have always been stingy toward Lynn, awarding only four when it seems she should have won twice that in the 1960s and '70s alone.

But in 1966, Lynn's classic Don't Come Home A-Drinkin' lost to Jeannie Seely's Don't Touch Me. Don't remember that one? Exactly.

In 1972, Donna Fargo's inane Happiest Girl in the Whole U.S.A. won instead of Lynn's blue-collar tribute, One's On the Way. In 1975, Lynn's groundbreaking The Pill lost to Linda Ronstadt's cover of I Can't Help It (If I'm Still in Love with You).

It gets worse. Coal Miner's Daughter, Fist City, You're Lookin' At Country and You Ain't Woman Enough (To Take My Man) weren't even nominated.

So if this Lifetime Achievement Award is a makeup call as they often are it's well-deserved. Odds are, Lynn isn't sweating it either way; her priorities have always been different from those of other stars.That happens when you grow up in poverty, get married at age 14, have four kids by the time you're 18, and don't even take up music professionally until you're 24. This is not the typical path to glory, but Lynn has long been famous for a stoic acceptance of playing the hand she has been dealt and moving on.The Depression kept its grip on Butcher Hollow during the 1930s and '40s. There were no cars or indoor plumbing, and the roads were dirt and gravel. If you didn't want to work the coal mines you got out, which is how Lynn ended up a 14-year-old bride in Washington state, where her husband, Doolittle, found work as a logger.By the time Lynn recorded her first single, I'm A Honky Tonk Girl, the normally daunting task of dealing with a cliqueish and close-minded music business must have seemed like child's play. She and Doo drove from Washington to Nashville, stopping at every radio station they could find along the way to promote the song.

She essentially willed the song into a hit, opening several doors in Nashville, and by 1962, Lynn's career was in overdrive. The hits didn't stop until the mid-1980s, when a dim-witted version of country that was heavily laced with middle-of-the-road pop became the flavor of the day. It was the antithesis of Lynn's blunt, backwoods artistry, and she retreated from the Top 40 merry-go-round to focus on performing.

Lynn reached a new level of street cred with Van Lear Rose, produced by The White Stripes' Jack White. She has been quiet since then, although she'll be part of this year's revived Lilith Fair tour, and your best chance to see her remains a visit to the very charming Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tenn., where she appears several times a year at a large outdoor amphitheater.Hurricane Mills is a direct reflection of Lynn. Her children and grandchildren perform with her, work at some of the attractions and own businesses in the area. You can wander into the flea market owned by her daughter, Betty Sue, and buy any number of things that her mother has randomly signed (toys, flower vases, photos). There's a replica of Lynn's log-cabin home in Butcher Hollow. And the land remains largely untouched, raw and beautiful, a place where you can put your feet in the water and doze off.

You get what you see, in other words. Just like with Loretta and her unflinching, unself-conscious and unambiguously gorgeous country music.

Reporter Jeffrey Lee Puckett

Loretta CD DO OUT This Fall

A new Loretta Lynn album featuring guest artists from a variety of genres will be released by Sony Nashville sometime this fall. The project marks the 50th anniversary of her debut single, "I'm A Honky Tonk Girl." Reissues of Loretta's 1976 autobiography and movie, Coal Miner's Daughter, are also due out this year. Loretta is being honored with the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award this weekend in Los Angeles.

Lynn Signs With Sony Nashville

by: Josh Stevens,
Country Icon Loretta Lynn has signed with Sony Nashville and is set to release a new Cd in the fall. The Cd will be a real treat as Lynn has been in the recording studio with artists from a variety of genres  most will appear on the new Cd. Next month Lynn marks her 50th year in the music business it will be 50 years ago that Honky Tonk  Girl was released to radio stations. Lynn is set to release three other Cd's as well one is a re-recorded songs of her greatest hit and some that Lynn herself thought should have been hits as well  some rare classics that have not been release onto Cd. also a Gospel Cd and a Christmas Cd will be released at a later date.

LORETTA LYNN ENTERTAINS ARKANSAS CROWD

By Charles Haymes

On Jan. 22, Loretta Lynn and her entourage stopped at the Reynolds Performance Hall on the campus of the University of Central Arkansas in Conway. The legendary songstress treated the audience to one hour of down-home fun and country music.

To a standing ovation, Lynn opened her set with They Dont Make Em Like My Daddy. Without interruption, she followed with Youre Lookin at Country, When the Tingle Becomes a Chill and I Wanna Be Free.

As flashbulbs flickered throughout the venue, Lynn sat in a chair and welcomed the crowd to her show. It has been a tradition in Lynns career that she often takes audience requests as opposed to sticking with a permanent set list. For the most part, Lynn sang whatever the crowd hollered. Those requests included such staples as You Aint Woman Enough, Fist City, Dont Come Home a Drinkin (With Lovin on Your Mind), The Pill and Your Squaw Is on the Warpath.

This marked Lynns first live show in three months. The rustiness could be blamed for Lynns struggles on Ones on the Way and Blue Kentucky Girl. However, the country superstar was in top form on knockout versions of Love Is the Foundation and Shes Got You.

Lynn often interacted with the audience, especially when she received a request for Im a Honky Tonk Girl.

Before performing the song, she said, Oh Honey, that was the first song I ever wrote. We put that thing out on the Zero record label, and zero was what I made on it too!

Additionally, she was very chatty about her late singing partner, Conway Twitty.

I know a lot of yall remember Conway Twitty, Lynn commented. He took part of his name from this town. He sure was a great singer. I loved him, and I miss him.

A little later in the show, rhythm guitarist Bart Hansen joined Lynn on one of her past duet hits with Twitty. Their rendition of Lead Me On was one of the evenings biggest crowd pleasers.
Born in Kentucky, Lynn is among musics most recognizable talents. From her rural upbringing to early motherhood to superstar status, the 75-year-old entertainer has never lost her desire to please the people that have helped make her a star. Throughout the night, it was evident by her facial expressions that her love for being on stage has never diminished.

Lynn surrounds herself with a host of fine musicians. Also, her show is enhanced by harmonies provided by a trio of backup singers. Near the end, the trio gave Lynn a few minutes of vocal rest. They performed two songs before gathering around her for a gospel medley, which was highlighted by Where No One Stands Alone.

Fittingly, Lynn closed the evening with her signature song, Coal Miners Daughter.

The concert was a bit of a throwback to country shows of the past. It was simply an artist, a band and believable music. Lynn needs no fancy stage design, nor does she require any up-and-coming stars to open her performance.

Today, her shows are a family affair. Promptly at 7:30, her son Ernest Ray opened with two songs. He was followed by three tunes by her twin daughters, known as The Lynns. And with no intermission, Lynn strolled on stage, giving the audience exactly what they wanted a country music concert.

Lynn is as country as turnip green


Music icon Loretta Lynn will be appearing at the Reynolds Performance Hall on the campus of the University of Central Arkansas in Conway on Friday. Show time is 7:30 p.m.

I will be there with bells on, Lynn said in a recent phone interview.

Lynn, who is as country as turnip greens, makes no bones about her rural upbringing and way of life. When she sings her hit Youre Looking at Country, she means it.

I couldnt be anything else but country, the 75-year-old performer stated. Even if I tried, I couldnt do it. I am just plain ole me. What you see is what you get.

Lynns rags-to-riches story has been well documented and defines hard work, ambition and talent. Born in the coal mining district of Kentucky, she married before her 14th birthday and was the mother of four children before the age of 18. It wasnt until she was 24 that her husband, Oliver Lynn, bought her a guitar and she seriously started pursuing a career in music.

In 1960, she recorded Im a Honky Tonk Girl for Zero Records. Her husband, who was often referred to as Doolittle, was a driving force in taking Lynn across the country, encouraging radio stations to play the song. The success of the single led to a major recording contract with Decca Records.

At that time, Patsy Cline was one of Decca Records top artists. Cline took Lynn under her wing and served as a mentor. However, early in Lynns career, Cline was killed in a plane crash. This was a tough blow for Lynn. Later, she gave birth to twins, naming one of them, Patsy.

Patsy was a very special person in my life, Lynn recalled. When I lost her, I thought that was the end of country music. She was a dear friend, and I always do at least one of her songs in my shows.

Lynn soon became a huge country music star while scoring numerous hit singles. Lynns trademark was her brassy songwriting skills. Songs such as You Aint Woman Enough, Dont Come Home a Drinkin (With Lovin on Your Mind), Fist City and Ones on the Way stand as prime examples.

I didnt really realize that others were not writing like that, she noted. The songs that told it like it was came natural for me. It was easy. I just wrote about what I was living.

In the midst of her success and truthful songwriting, Lynn faced some criticism with The Pill. In 1975, the song landed in the top five of the charts, but wasnt accepted by everyone in the industry.

A whole lot of radio stations wouldnt play that song, and I couldnt understand that, she commented. Every woman that I knew was taking the pill except me, and I had the kids to prove it!

Aside from her solo hits, Lynn enjoyed a successful duet career with Conway Twitty. Together, they had many successful singles, most notably After the Fire Is Gone and Lead Me On.

Theres not a day that goes by that I dont miss Conway, she said. We made a lot of great records together, and he was a true friend.

In 1980, her life hit the silver screen. Titled after her hit song Coal Miners Daughter, the movie won an Academy Award and further enhanced Lynns image.

When I first heard that they were going to make a movie about me, I couldnt believe it, Lynn said. I had a big part in putting it all together, and I was the one that suggested Sissy Spacek to play me in the movie. I thought it was great, and I thought Tommy Lee Jones did a great job playing my husband. Still to this day, he hasnt gotten as much recognition for that part as he deserves.

Lynn continued to place singles in the charts in the decade of the 1980s but stepped out of the limelight when her husband became ill. He died in 1996.

Without a major recording in some time, Lynn returned in 2004 with Van Lear Rose. The album was edgy yet honest and garnered droves of critical acclaim.

Lynn has received countless awards and accolades in her career. On Jan. 31, she will add one more to her mantle as she receives the Grammys Lifetime Achievement Award.

When asked about the current state of country music, Lynn quickly replied, It aint country!

Her feelings make a valid point, but one thing is for certain the Coal Miners Daughter is 100 percent country.

Charles Haymes is a writer from Beebe and a member of both the Country Music Association and the International Bluegrass Music Association.

Loretta Lynn and Norah Jones to Play Lilith Fair


Loretta Lynn and Norah Jones

Loretta Lynn has been added to the 2010 lineup of the Lilith Fair, the music tour of female performers. Ms. Lynn, Cat Power, Kate Nash, Norah Jones and Lissie were among the artists announced by the festival producers this week. The festival also added San Diego, Phoenix and Austin to the tour. I have never done shows with just other girl singers, Ms. Lynn said in a statement. When I first started out, they said girl singers couldnt sell records or concert tickets. Weve come a long way since then and were gonna have a big time out there!


Gardens plan must aim at greatness

however, nor the garlic bread one, which is even more unlikely. It did, in fact, involve country-music singer Loretta Lynn. Yep, the Kentucky coal miners daughter is credited with words of wisdom so profound they should be tattooed on the chests of everyone involved in the redevelopment of Aberdeens Union Terrace Gardens.

Loretta Lynn said: You have to be first, different or great. If youre one of them you may make it.

That observation defines beautifully what separates the somebodies from the nobodies. By implication, it also means that if you have a grand plan but it isnt first, different or great, you face a future of relative anonymity, an existence more Primark than Prada. In other words, you aint gonna make it.

I have a problem with the arguments raging over the future of Union Terrace Gardens and that difficulty has been summed up perfectly by Loretta Lynn. To me, none of the current proposals fully meets the test of being first, different or great.

The ultimate aim is to be all three, of course. To be the Wright Brothers, the Beatles, J.K. Rowling or Roger Bannister takes innovation and skill way above that of most ordinary mortals. Similarly, to be a Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King or Mother Teresa with a vision for the future requires a commitment that few of us possess.

Dennis Adkins: Songsmith

By Kim Mason:

The Adkins Brothers with Loretta Lynn. 1968. L to R: Dennis Adkins, Loretta Lynn, Bob Adkins. Submitted photo.

From the beginning of his career, Dennis Adkins has held the respect of country music royalty.  Groomed for performance by Loretta Lynn, he honed his songwriting skills under the tutelage of Mel Tillis and penned a number one hit called Ace in the Hole which was recorded by the King of Country, George Strait.

The grandson of a railroad man, Dennis Adkins was born in 1953 in the small railroad junction town of Corydon, Indiana.  As a child he loved to sing, but when Beatlemania hit, like many other youngsters, he was inspired to pick up a guitar. His aunt, a semi-professional ragtime piano player, taught him to play Hound Dog.
Bob Adkins also played private clubs as bass player for Ethyl Holland and the Blue Echoes. (Larry Richardson, lead guitar; Ethyl Holland, guitar/vocals.)  Though only thirteen, when their drummer quit, Dennis was able to learn to play drums well enough to earn the position.  They performed current hits by performers like Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette and secured a gig at the Moose Lodge every friday.  Dennis recalls The old guy at the door charged a quarter and he kept them in a cigar box.  We got that or $10, whichever was greater.  Larry and I would eat that up in cheeseburgers at the bar.

The weekly radio show followed a Grand Ole Opry format and aired each Saturday. Two of their costars each week were Crystal Gayle (then known as Brenda Gayle) and her sister Peggy Sue.  The girls mother and stepfather ran the station.  Their sister, Loretta Lynn was just splitting with the Wilburn Brothers and was already a star when she started to featured The Adkins Brothers in her shows.  It was my first taste of the big time.  I got to work with lots of the old time Opry acts. recalls Dennis.

They began to tour with Loretta.  I was  taking it all in. It was just great to be around something like that.  Its wierd how you just learn things by hanging out.  Some professions you really cant go to school for because 80% of success is just showing up.  It keeps a lot of people from making it.  We always said in Nashville, You must be present to win.

Country Christmas TOP 10 all time Christmas record

6. Loretta Lynn, Country Christmas You could actually pick just about any song from her 1966 album A Country Christmas and not be sad. Part of the joy of that record is its rarity: it was the only Christmas album ever released by countrys greatest-ever female singer-songwriter, which is rather refreshing, considering that these days artists regurgitate and repackage album after album with bonus tracks and empty covers. (Come on, George Strait three Christmas albums?) There are four songs Lynn wrote or co-wrote for it, including the joyous title track and a great woman-done-wrong song, I Wont Decorate Your Christmas Tree (the only thing approximating a YouTube video is this, which I highly recommend. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp5lQtt9jlU). The album is elevated from a feel-good slice of rural life to a prized artifact by the preposterously talented pedal-steel player Hal Rugg.

Van Lear Rose top 5 cd's of the decade

4 Van Lear Rose, Loretta Lynn, with Jack White (2004): White is the dominant figure of the decade in rock 'n' roll, and here we see the true extent of his genius. He takes the vintage queen of country and says genres be damned. Top track: High on a Mountain

Loretta in the top 10 best of the decade

7. Van Lear Rose Loretta Lynn

By the time Jack White got to her, Loretta Lynn had nothing to prove. Shed already punched her ticket as one of the greatest country singers of all time. Perhaps thats what makes Van Lear Rose so special. That Lynn was willing to step outside her comfort zone to make a decidedly hard-charging record speaks to her desire not to go gracefully into that good night. While there arent any songs as great as D-I-V-O-R-C-E or Rated X, this album is full of near-classics. From the barroom romp of Portland, Oregon to the desperate plea of Have Mercy, the album pushes her great storytelling into a more classic rock zone.

Of snowness and of sleeves: 15 strange holiday songs that deserve to be Christmas classics

7. Loretta Lynn, To Heck With Ole Santa Claus (1966)
Loretta Lynns sweet country songs have always had a bit of a nasty edge, from the brutal kiss-off of Fist City to the no-means-no anthem Dont Come Home A-Drinkin. This deceptively sweet-sounding holiday number, penned by Lynn herself, contains the fury of a woman scorned at Christmas: After getting stiffed for a present, she threatens jolly ol St. Nick with a panoply of revenge scenarios, including falling in the snow, receiving a beating, and getting burned to death after he comes down the chimney. Hopefully her husband got the message.

Tired of Christmas 'favorites'? Try these different holiday tunes

  To Heck With Ole Santa Claus, by Loretta Lynn. Santa didnt bring the music legend what she wanted last year. So this year, she says, When he dashes through the snow, I hope he falls. Let that be a lesson: Do not get on the bad side of a coal miners daughter.

Loretta Lynn feels 'great,' is recovering from flu

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Country music legend Loretta Lynn is "feeling great" and planning a trip to her home in the Bahamas over the holidays, according to her daughter Patsy Lynn Russell.

Reports have circulated on the Web about Lynn's declining health after she canceled her four remaining shows this year because of the flu.

Russell says Lynn will return to the U.S. in late January to resume touring She will head to Los Angeles at the end of January to receive her Lifetime Achievement Grammy from the Recording Academy. Other honorees at the Jan. 30 ceremony include Michael Jackson, Leonard Cohen, Bobby Darin, Andre Previn, and Clark Terry. They will also be recognized during the Grammys on Jan. 31, airing live on CBS.

Leadership lessons from Obama, mismanagement tips from Scrooge

.S. President Barack Obama was criticized for dithering, taking too long to formulate his Afghanistan policy. But leadership expert Michael Watkins, writing on Harvard Business School's blogs, views it as a 'deeply deliberative' decision-making process that offers lessons for managers everywhere:
POWER POINTS

Tip from a coal miner's daughter

Marketing advice from country singer Loretta Lynn: "You either have to be first, best, or different." The Planning Shop Report


Loretta Lynn to Receive Lifetime Grammy Honor

Three-time Grammy Award winner Loretta Lynn has been announced as the recipient of a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. The Recording Academy announced that the 'Coal Miner's Daughter' will be joined in the honor by Michael Jackson, songwriter Leonard Cohen, singer Bobby Darin, blues musician David "Honeyboy" Edwards, conductor and composer Andr Previn, and jazz artist Clark Terry.

Another Nashville mainstay, musician and Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley, will receive a Trustees Award, along with Walter C. Miller, longtime television producer and director of such specials as the CMA, Tony and Grammy Awards.

A special invitation-only ceremony will be held on Jan. 30, 2010, and formal acknowledgment of all of the Special Merit Award winners will be made during the 52nd Annual Grammy Awards telecast on Jan. 31, 2010, set to air live on CBS at 8:00 PM ET

Lynn, Bradley win Grammy awards

Thursday, December 10, 2009 Loretta Lynn and Harold Bradley were among those honored by the Recording Academy with special awards. Lynn received, along with Leonard Cohen, Bobby Darin, David "Honeyboy" Edwards, Michael Jackson, Andre Previn and Clark Terry, Lifetime Achievement Award. Bradley took a Trustees Award along with Florence Greenberg and Walter C. Miller.

AKG and Thomas Alva Edison were Technical Grammy Award honorees.

The special invitation-only ceremony will be held during Grammy Week on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010, and a formal acknowledgment will be made during the 52nd Annual Grammy Awards telecast in Los Angeles.

Three-time Grammy winner Lynn has been in the industry for nearly 50 years. She gained success when her 1960 debut single I'm A Honky Tonk Girl became a huge hit. Throughout her illustrious career, Lynn has had more than 70 hits including You Ain't Woman Enough, Don't Come Home A-Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind) and Coal Miner's Daughter, which was also the name of her autobiography that was later adapted into a Hollywood film. In 1971, she began a professional partnership with fellow country artist Conway Twitty and the pair became one of the most successful duos in country history. In 2004, at the 47th Annual Grammy Awards, Lynn won a pair of Grammys for her collaboration with Jack White on the album "Van Lear Rose."

Loretta Lynn earns Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award

Loretta LynnCountry Music Hall of Famer Loretta Lynn is among an esteemed group of performers who will receive a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in January.

Lynn joins Leonard Cohen, Michael Jackson, Bobby Darin, David "Honeyboy" Edwards, Andre Previn and Clark Terry in receiving the honor, which will be given during an invitation-only event on Saturday, Jan. 30 in Los Angeles. A formal acknowledgment will also be made during the Grammy telecast, on Sunday, Jan. 31.

Another Country Music Hall of Famer, guitarist Harold Bradley, is also getting a big prize from the Grammy folks: He'll receive a Trustees Award during the same January 30 event. (Bradley, by the way, played on many of Lynn's biggest hits, and his brother, Owen Bradley, was Lynn's producer of choice.)


Carrie Underwood Special

he real theme of the show, a mix of songs performed in front of a studio audience and taped bits of comedy, was, as she put it, a behind-the-scenes look at my life. These included jolly little japes that played on Underwoods supposed Hollywood innocence, such as trying to set up her sister Stephanie with dates that included Carson Kressley and a Johnny Depp impersonator. Underwoods mom and dog Ace also got their brief, starring moments. Underwoods own best funniness was a fake-flashback that showed her stuffing envelopes with cash for the Idol judges before her 2005 win.

Also highly amusing was Carol Leifer (hello, Carol!) playing Underwoods manager, Gwen Lefkowitz. She had best line of the night, re Carrie: Its like hearing Bible verses come to life.

Musical high points included What Can I Say, performed with the sharp young trio Sons of Sylvia. There was also a fine Carrie duet with Brad Paisley, with whom she sang while he was performing somewhere else and projected on a screen above Underwood. It could have been awkward; instead, it sounded terrific. Of course, it helped that the song they chose, Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man, was the fine 1973 hit for a classic country twosome, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn. Toward the end, Underwood also delivered some fine Christmas songs, including Jesus Take The Wheel and O Holy Night.

Is our new mayor tough enough for Crisco?

Last night, Kinston jumped the broom with a new mayor. While many feel this is the dawning of a new era, Im more of the mind that this is a temporary blip of optimism.

I dont know him, but B.J. Murphy seems like a nice and capable man, but so were his opponents. All things being equal, if he turns out to be the greatest mayor in the history of the universe, how much can he do? Will Kinston be brimming with Starbucks and other overpriced businesses heretofore only allowed to flourish in havens of disposable income like Raleigh and Charlottte? Of course not.

I know nothing about the law, except that when a judge tells you to stay at least 1,000 feet away from country music legend Loretta Lynn, youd sure better do it. So what if I wrote Mrs. Lynn a fan letter a day for 22 years?

It shouldnt be illegal for a grown man to ask a grown woman to autograph his tub of Crisco, even if it happens to be outside of her husbands memorial service? I think its what Doo would have wanted. Youve done the Doo, Loretta, now move on.

As far as the legality of the annexation, the residents attorney will probably get the annexation thrown out on the aforementioned technicalities, but that doesnt mean the Kinston City Council cant or wont hire somebody with a sixth grade education to draft it again in 2010, which means another year of anger, frustration, and lawyers fees.

Global Debt Crisis

"Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die." ~ Loretta Lynn

Loretta was singing about kicking the bucket. Kicking the can is what people do before they kick the bucket. It is also what Congress does before Treasury bills kick the bucket.

It has become clear to millions of voters around the world that their national governments have not offered statistically viable solutions to the looming budget deficits. These deficits threaten to consume more than the future revenues available to the various national governments to fulfill their long-term promises and welfare programs for oldsters.

Central bankers can call this to a halt at any time by ceasing to purchase assets. This would stabilize the monetary base, at least until banks started failing, thereby contracting M1. This would produce a depression. Politicians say they want solutions to the budget deficit problem, but the political price is the replacement of incumbents by newly elected politicians who campaigned on a call for an end to the depression.

Everybody wants to go to heaven: stable money, rising employment, and economic growth. But nobody wants to walk through the valley of the shadow of death: Great Depression 2.

Behind The Scenes With Country Music's Biggest Stars

"IN THE SPOTLIGHT WITH ROBIN ROBERTS: BRIGHT LIGHTS. BIG STARS. ALL ACCESS NASHVILLE" AIRS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10 on ABC Exclusive Access with Carrie Underwood, Tim McGraw, Martina McBride, Loretta Lynn, Rosanne Cash and Vince GillThe star-power continues on "In The Spotlight", with a report on the next generation of country music royalty... the young singers like Tayla Lynn, grand-daughter of Loretta Lynn, and Jenny Gill, daughter of Vince Gill, who are trying to mix talent and a famous last name as a formula for success in Nashville. Roberts travels to Hurricane Mills, TN for a rare interview with the original coal miner's daughter, Loretta Lynn, and also speaks to country star Rosanne Cash, daughter of Johnny Cash, and inheritor of what is arguably the biggest country music legacy of all time. The report examines both the positive and negative effects of being related to a legend. Finally, "In The Spotlight" asks Americans to answer the question country music fans have been asking for years. What's the Greatest Country Song of All Time? In this fun, musical trip down memory lane, "In The Spotlight" hears from fans, the biggest stars of country from Taylor Swift to Rascal Flatts, and even from the nation's "Country Music Fan in Chief", President Barack Obama. Viewers around the country will have the chance to go to abcnews.com to cast their vote. The winning song will be revealed the following morning on ABC News' "Good Morning America" (7:00 to 9:00am on ABC)

Loretta In The Spot LIght With Robin Roberts

http://abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=8952523

VIDEO: Robin Roberts sits down with Loretta Lynn.

Loretta Lynn on Her Name

Loretta talks about her granddaughter and the "Lynn" last name.


The legendary Loretta Lynn dusts off her cowboy boots for Robin Roberts in Hurricane Mills, Tenn. Lynn and her family talked with Roberts for a new country music special, airing Nov. 10 on ABC. (Donna Svennevik/ABC)

Candid Conversations With Country Music's Hottest Stars and Up-and-Comers ABC's Primetime TV Special, 'In The Spotlight With Robin Roberts,' Will Air Nov. 10

By ARI PINKUS




Sometimes a famous last name in country music can bring both assets and liabilities. In Hurricane Mills, Tenn., Roberts interviews the original coal miner's daughter, Loretta Lynn and country star Rosanne Cash, daughter of Johnny Cash.

Meanwhile, the next generation of country music royalty isn't waiting in the wings. Young singers including Tayla Lynn, granddaughter of Loretta Lynn, and Jenny Gill, daughter of Vince Gill, mix their talent with their famous last names to succeed in Nashville. In addition to the TV special, additional exclusive interview footage, videos, photos and music will be available at a new, special section at www.abcnews.com/country.

ABC wants to hear from you, too. Go online and cast your vote beginning Oct. 30. Then, on Nov. 11., the winning song will be revealed on "Good Morning America."

"In The Spotlight With Robin Roberts: Big Lights. Big Stars. All Access Nashville" airs Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 10 p.m. EST on ABC. Click here to visit our special section for full coverage.

 

Loretta Lynns request line still open

After more than four decades in show business, Loretta Lynn knows her limits.

Would she consider a guest mentor spot on American Idol? Sure.

Dancing With the Stars? Not so much.

I cant dance my way out of a paper bag, she said in a recent phone interview.

Lynn, known for her hit single Coal Miners Daughter and the memoir and film of the same title, comes to the RiverCenter for the Performing Arts Saturday.

Fans should bring their request lists to the show.

Whatever they want to hear, they can holler it out, she said. Ive never planned the show.

The approach reflects Lynns career, defined largely by the singers connection with her listeners.

Lynn was born in Kentucky, and watched her father earn a living as a coal miner.

She married her husband nicknamed Doo when she was barely 14.

The pair later traveled across the country promoting Lynns music.

Soon, thanks in part to Patsy Clines influence, Lynns musical uniqueness surfaced.

Songs like You Aint Woman Enough (to Take My Man) and I Wanna Be Free spoke to the ordinary woman the one concerned with sustaining a family and a sense of self.

As a guest on The Dick Frost Show, Lynn famously dozed off while listening to feminist Betty Friedan talk theory.

Lynns breed of female empowerment focuses more on emotions the same gritty sense of identity that characterizes contemporary country songs like Carrie Underwoods Before He Cheats and Miranda Lamberts Gunpowder and Lead.

Since entering the music scene in the early 60s, Lynn has seen plenty of changes within her genre.

Thanks to crossover success, country music stars now win awards on MTV well, assuming they can tolerate an outburst from Kanye West.

(Lynns take on West interrupting Taylor Swift at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards: He didnt need to be doing that.)

Lynns reaction to country musics expanding appeal?

I think its good, she said. For her 2004 release, Van Lear Rose, Lynn teamed with producer Jack White of rock act the White Stripes.

On the surface, Whites rocker image seems like an odd contrast to Lynns country roots, but the album got rave reviews including a Grammy.

Lynn said shes still friends with White, but hes hard to reach.

Hes out of town most of the time, Lynn said.

She hopes to lure White with chicken and dumplings, maybe some bread.

The comment echoes Lynns popular simplicity.

Amid the music industrys bright lights and reality TV stars, the singer brings her audiences the kind of comfort that comes with a home-cooked meal.

After all, Lynn isnt too picky about the legacy she leaves as long as they can say Im a good person, she said.

special to the ledger-enquirer Loretta Lynn, known for her hit single Coal Miners Daughter and the movie it inspired, performs at the RiverCenter Saturday.

IF YOU GO

What: Loretta Lynn

Where: RiverCenter for the Performing Arts

When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday

Cost: $34-$49

Details: 706-256-3612


Wearing her crown lightly:

Loretta Lynn, country queen, retains her just-folks appeal

By Mary Colurso -- The Birmingham News

Loretta Lynn 101109.jpgAs any fan will tell, Loretta Lynn wears fluffy, puffy, elaborately detailed gowns on stage. Are they comfortable? They really are, Lynn says. The only thing I hate about them, theyre so heavy. They have rhinestones on the top of them, and on the bottom of them. They probably weigh 10 pounds. If they feel too heavy, Ill sit down. (Special)

Picture the Coal Miners Daughter at home, chatting with a reporter for the umpteenth time in her career.

"I have my hair tied up in a fat towel," Loretta Lynn, 74, reveals. "I put a rinse on it."

The homey warmth and down-to-earth honesty youd expect from this Nashville icon are much in evidence, even over the phone. But Lynn sounds slightly scattered at the moment, less than an hour before a scheduled rehearsal.

Her personal assistant, Tim Cobb, comes in, and theres some talk about gardening.

"Hes out in the yard weed-eating," Lynn says with a chuckle. "I like to get out in the yard, every now and then."

Also, the star says shes coping with a "little headache" nothing like the back and shoulder problems she endured three years ago and the soothing power of the medicine hasnt hit her yet.

"Im good, no problems at all," Lynn says. "For the last few years, Ive probably felt better than when I was 40."

No wonder, then, shes hitting the road this fall, playing a handful of dates each month until mid-December. One of those concerts is set for Friday, Oct. 16, at Birminghams Alys Stephens Center, where Lynn will appear with her longtime band, the Coal Miners.

Her tour dates tend to be family affairs, featuring one of Lynns sons, guitarist Ernest Ray; two daughters, twin singers Patsy and Peggy; and one granddaughter, singer Tayla.

"I dont have to work, so I work when I want to," Lynn says. "I stay home and it bothers me. Im working pretty hard this month. But I have it good on the road now, not like when I started. I have my bus fixed up just like a home, with five TVs in it. Theres a complete kitchen, a complete bathroom and a half-bathroom. Its all my own."

At this point, of course, its impossible for Lynn to present all of her hits during a single show. But she understands what listeners expect and crave: No. 1 singles such as "Fist City," "Coal Miners Daughter," "Shes Got You" and "Dont Come Home A Drinkin (With Lovin on Your Mind)."

Lynn also delves into her long list of signature songs: "Youre Lookin at Country," "Here I Am Again," "When the Tingle Becomes a Chill" and "You Aint Woman Enough (To Take My Man)."

During the 1960s and 70s, the frank nature of her lyrics caused Lynn to be a controversial figure in the country-music industry; she wasnt afraid to talk about touchy subjects such as sex, adultery or birth control.

"It didnt bother me one bit, because it was true-to-life," she says. "Everybody was doing it, so why not put it into a song?"

A feisty stance comes naturally to her, yet Lynn says much of her recent material takes a more spiritual approach.

"I think Ive mellowed out some," she says. "Some of the songs are religious: You Dont Pray and Thank God for Jesus. Thats such an easy title, but no ones ever wrote it. I had about five songs started for another album, but I just hadnt finished them. Every time, I sat down, I couldnt do it. So Ive been working with a kid, Shawn Camp. He wrote a lot of hits, and he finished them for me. I like working with him."

LORETTA LYNNLoretta Lynn at the Grand Ole Opry in 1995. She made her first appearance at the Opry in 1960. (AP / Mark Humphrey)Camp, a singer, guitarist and fiddler, has roots as a bluegrass sideman and cuts recorded by the likes of Garth Brooks, Randy Travis, Guy Clark and Brooks & Dunn. Lynn says theyre developing other tunes with relationship themes, about male-female struggles and the possibility of heartbreak.

"But Im kind of making it a little easier to listen to," she says. "You know, I write things, throw it out and put it in the garbage can. Sometimes I drag it out again."

Fans can expect two new recordings from Lynn fairly soon, although shes not specific about the release dates.

"The religious album first," she says, "then Im re-recording some of the songs that have been to No. 1. I have 37 of them."

In the meantime, Lynn contributed tracks to the latest records by Elvis Costello and Todd Snider, co-writing "I Felt the Chill Before Winter Came" (on Costellos "Secret, Profane and Sugarcane") and "Dont Tempt Me" (on Sniders "The Excitement Plan"). She sang a duet with Snider, as well.

"Todd Snider is such a great kid," Lynn says. "Hed say, Ill sit here and watch you write. He thinks everything I do is great. And Id be, Help me here, buddy."

Also on the horizon: Another cookbook from Lynn, similar to the one published in 2004, "Youre Cookin It Country: My Favorite Recipes and Memories."

"Everybody loves the stories in that," Lynn says, "so Ill have to do more. You know, my husband threw out my cooking for the first six months. But I learned pretty fast."

Learning how to pace herself as the queen of country was more difficult, as Lynn famously revealed in the two volumes of her autobiography. She's got that part down as a senior citizen, though, and has no intention of stopping.

"Maybe 20 years from now," Lynn says, "Ill retire."



Loretta Lynns Earned Her Work Schedule

Anyone whos seen the Loretta Lynn biopic Coal Miners Daughter knows she earned her first hit single when she and her husband, Oliver Doolittle Lynn, drove around the country visiting radio stations in a cramped automobile.

That was in 1960. Almost 50 years later, shes still working regularly, though she gets to pick and choose when, where and how often she does.

I dont have to work, so I work when I want to, she told The Birmingham News. I stay home and it bothers me But I have it good on the road now, not like when I started. I have my bus fixed up just like a home, with five TVs in it. Theres a complete kitchen, a complete bathroom and a half-bathroom. Its all my own.

Not that the road is the only place she works. Lorettas developoing a gospel album, shes re-recording many of her earlier hits, and shes been co-writing with Shawn Camp, whose composing credits include Garth Brooks Two Pina Coladas, George Straits River Of Love and Josh Turners Firecracker.

Despite penning such classics as Coal Miners Daughter, Dont Come Home ADrinkin (With Lovin On Your Mind) and You Aint Woman Enough, Loretta doesnt just crank the songs out. They undergo numerous drafts before they reach the public.

I write things, throw it out and put it in the garbage can, she said. Sometimes I drag it out again.

Lorettas work as a writer paid off with an induction last year into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Shes also been a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame since 1983.

Her upcoming road work includes shows Friday in Birmingham and Saturday in Columbus, Ga. She takes her homey bus next week to Ontario and Minnesota.

Elvis To Sing with Loretta

Loretta Lynn co-wrote a song for the new album by Todd Snider. Don't Tempt Me is on The Excitement Plan, out now on Yep Rock.
The two got together after Lynn specifically asked for Snider as a writing partner. Their sessions produced three songs, the one on Snider's album and one that will be on Lynn's upcoming LP where she'll sing it with Elvis Costello. That's right I said LP  Lynn will be putting a true to real LP out as well as a CD on this next project scheduled to be released around December  Lynn is also working on a CD of new Christmas songs one of the songs is about a cheating reindeer can't wait to hear this one. Lynn is also working on a new a Gospel CD and a remake CD of all her classic number one hit's and some that she feels should have always been number including some of her very first song she ever wrote.

12th Annual Fall Trail Ride Loretta Lynns Ranch

Presented by Southern Woods Rider Inc.

September 29th, 2009

October 16, 17 & 18, 2009 Preregistration Ends 10/03/09 !!! SAVE$$ -Get pre-registration forms at www.southernwoodsrider.com

Southern Woods Rider Inc. is proud to announce the 12th Annual Fall Trail Ride at the Loretta Lynns Ranch. Southern Woods Rider continues the strong tradition of the fall ride in the education of participants on safety and trail etiquette while continuing to bring riders of all ages exhilarating riding opportunities. All ATV and Dirt Bike riding responsible individuals and families are welcome to attend.

Rider Fees

Preregistration fee: Adults $40.00 Children 12 yrs. and younger $25.00 Fee at the event: Adults $50.00 Children 12 yrs. and younger $35.00
**NEW** Sunday only at the event fee: Adults $45.00 Children 12 yrs. and younger $30.00

(Preregistration Ends 10/03/09. Get pre-registration forms at www.southernwoodsrider.com

Friday Night Poker Run

Best hand winning $150.00. There will be a mandatory short riders meeting at 7:30 pm with last rider out 8:15 pm. Lights are required and imaginative battery operated lights are encouraged as long as you can see in the dark. This activity is weather permitting and available to event participants only. A $5.00 entry fee will be taken at riders meeting before the run.

KTM demo rides

Southern Woods Rider is excited to announce that KTM North American will return to this years Fall Trail Ride. To help celebrate the 12th Annual event KTM will have their big orange Support Semi with large selection of bikes and ATVs for all participants to explore. Demo rides on a few of the popular models will be offered Friday and Saturday from 9:30 am 12:00 pm and from 1:00 to 2:30 pm. Look for the KTM semi during the event for more details.

Schedule

Thursday October 15, 2009 registration 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Friday October 16, 2009

Registration 7:00 am to 12:00 pm & 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm MANDATORY Riders Meeting 8:30 am and/or 10:00 am FRIDAY NIGHT POKER RUN 7:30 pm Saturday October 17, 2009 Registration 7:00 am to 12:00 pm MANDATORY Riders Meeting 8:30 am and/or 10:00 am BBQ Family Banquet 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Sunday October 18, 2009

Registration 7:00 am to 11:00 am
MANDATORY Riders Meeting 8:30 am and/or 10:00 am weather Permitting the trail head opens all three days at 9:00 am and closes at 3:00 pm This event is Rain or Shine.

For more detailed information including preregistration forms please visit www.southernwoodsrider.com

Feel free to contact us at: rideinfo@southernwoodsrider.com
Phone: 615/848-9082

Please help support our sponsors!

Tom Stotler President
Kelley Stotler Secretary

Southern Woods Rider supports the principle of Tread Quietly, Lightly and Legally.

Motor Cycle/ATV riding is an inherently dangerous sport. Southern Woods Rider Inc. is not responsible for any injuries you receive during their sponsored events, or any other activates of SWRs you attend. Always ride with caution and use all available protective gear to minimize the possibility of injuries.



ABC Robin Roberts Interviews Loretta Lynn

GMA Good Morning America was at the Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills Tn On Saturday Night interviewing Lynn for a up coming piece on GMA Roberts also attending Lynn's Ranch Concert Lynn's Son Ernest Ray and the Coal Miner's and the Lynn's opened the show before America's Country Sweetheart Loretta Lynn herself came out and wowed the crowed even though her eye was bothering her from surgery she had Lynn joked saying the whole world looks a lot better when you can't see clearly.Lynn did all the classics from Honky Tonk Girl to Patsy Cline's She's Got You. Tayla Lynn one of Loretta's grand daughter's came out and put a new twist on Lynn's Hit Rated X and then then went into Mad Mrs Leroy Brown for Lynn's acclaimed 2004 cd Van Lear Rose. Lynn was also stated that she is in the studio recording with her daughter Cissie Lynn and her Husband John Beams.

Loretta Lynn Invites Robbie Thomas to Do Special Readings at Her Home

 

Loretta LynnLoretta Lynn invites acclaimed psychic Robbie Thomas to join her and friends for an inspiring event on her peaceful yet haunted Tennessee estate. After receiving an invite from Loretta's manager, Patsy Lynn, at the request of Loretta, Robbie followed up with a phone discussion in which he and Loretta spoke about possibly televising the event. Robbie says that during the conversation with Loretta he knew he had connected with a powerfully wise and spiritual soul and was humbled that such a presence as Loretta Lynn would invite him and his talents to do a reading of her home and life.

Loretta Lynn - singer, songwriter and 'Coal Miner's Daughter' who inspired the film and #1 hit song by the same name - is a beloved icon of the American music industry and American history. Loretta continues to tour and perform to sell-out crowds across the country.





Watch here at the Robbie Thomas official web site for further information on this event.

For more information about the lovely Loretta Lynn and her tour dates, follow the links below.

Loretta Lynn's Official Web Site

Loretta's Tour Dates 

Loretta's Beautiful, Peaceful RV Park

Loretta's Dude Ranch

Loretta's Music 

Loretta's Store 

Van Lear Rose

Loretta Lynn's Loretta Lynn
AWARD WINNING CD
Van Lear Rose

Purchase
Reviews
Tracks & Info



 

Loretta Lynn: A Songwriter of Uncommon Vision & Depth

Photo

When Her late producer and record-label chief Owen Bradley called Loretta Lynn the female Hank Williams, he was referring to her striking originality as a writer-artist.  

True, her clarion-call voice is one of country musics most distinctive. But what truly sets Loretta Lynn apart is her songwriting ability. As her self-penned Van Lear Rose collection demonstrated in 2004, she is a composer of uncommon vision and depth.

A BMI affiliate for 49 years, Lynn launched her career in 1960 with her self-composed Im a Honky Tonk Girl. The song brought her to Nashville and was her springboard to stardom. When Bradley signed her to Decca Records, he realized at once that she had a highly personal and singular style as a writer. He encouraged this individuality.

So she was soon topping the charts with feisty female classics she wrote, including You Aint Woman Enough (1966), Dont Come Home a Drinkin (1966), What Kind of Girl (Do You Think I Am) (1967), Fist City (1968),  Your Squaw Is on the Warpath (1968), You Wanna Give Me a Lift (1970), I Wanna Be Free (1971) and Youre Lookin at Country (1971).

I was the first one to write it like the women lived it, she said of her forceful songs. Probably I was different in writing about things that nobody would even talk about in public. I didn't realize that they didn't. I thought, Well, gee, this is what's going on; I'll write about it. I was writing about life. And, of course, I had a lot of songs banned. Singles like 1969s Wings Upon Your Horns, 1972s Rated X and 1975s The Pill were all considered controversial.

Although best known for her chin-out, self-assertive numbers, Lynns songs cover a much wider range. She wrote for all 29 albums she created between 1962 and 1974, crafting gospel pieces, Christmas tunes, duets with Ernest Tubb and songs in a variety of other styles. Consider the diversity of such hit Lynn compositions as 1969s To Make a Man, 1966s Dear Uncle Sam and 1970s I Know How.

She also wrote for others, notably Tubbs Im Gonna Make Like a Snake (1968), Charlie Louvins Sittin Bull (1970), sister Crystal Gayles disc debut Ive Cried the Blue Right Out of My Eyes (1970) and tunes for The Wilburn Brothers, Warner Mack, sister Peggy Sue and brother Jay Lee Webb. In all, there are more than 150 songs in Lynns BMI catalog.

To spotlight its stars talent, Decca titled a 1970 LP Loretta Lynn Writes Em and Sings Em . She drove the point home with her very next single, her autobiography in song, Coal Miners Daughter.

Her best-selling book and Oscar-winning film of the same title chronicled her rise from Appalachian poverty, marriage at age 13, career exhaustion and ultimate triumph. They also made Loretta Lynn an international idol in the 1970s.

She continued to appear on the country charts throughout the 1980s. She provided Wouldnt It Be Great to her 1993 Honky Tonk Angels trio album with Dolly Parton and Tammy Wynette. She also wrote songs for her 2000 comeback CD Still Country , including I Cant Hear the Music, her moving elegy to husband Mooney Lynn, who died in 1996. The acclaimed 2004 Van Lear Rose CD found her at a new peak of her powers as a tunesmtih.

Loretta Lynn entered the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1983 and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1988. Now she becomes one of the rare songwriters who have been named a BMI Icon. But this legendary ladys head has never been turned by accolades and honors.

I aint no star, she has said. A star is something up in the night sky. People say to me, Youre a legend. Im not a legend. Im just a woman.

Written by Robert K. Oermann

Costello: 'Secret, Profane...,' 4.5 stars

"I Felt the Chill Before the Winter Came," a co-write with the great Loretta Lynn, is devastating country gold, from the opening line, "Well, there's a difference in the way that you kiss me." And Costello knows enough to undersell the pathos in his vocal where a lesser singer would have poured it on too strong.

Song Writer Johnny Mullins Dies

Johnny Mullins, the soft-spoken, songwriting school janitor who crooned his way to a Grammy Award nomination, died at 2:30 a.m. Wednesday in Springfield. But it was his country chart hit, " By age 57, Mullins had nearly 30 popular singles and record album cuts including "Success" by Loretta Lynn, and religious hits like "Move Up a Little Closer" by several quartets.By age 57, Mullins had nearly 30 popular singles and record album cuts including "Success" by Loretta Lynn, and religious hits like "Move Up a Little Closer" by several quartets. Blue Kentucky Girl," recorded by Emmylou Harris, that won him an invitation to the Grammy Awards in 1980. (The song lost to Kenny Rogers' "You Decorated My Life.")Mullins told the News-Leader when "Blue Kentucky Girl" was climbing the charts in 1979: "I'm a custodian first and a songwriter second. I don't seek publicity. I just hope they play the fire out of my songs and mention my name every once in a while."

Jack and the Stones

 

There's a rumor floating around that the Stones might be looking to raw-boned rocker Jack White to produce their next record. Mr. White is known as a performer with the White Stripes, Raconteurs and Dead Weather, but he's also a formidable producer.

His work a few years back with Loretta Lynn resulted in an amazing record that redefined the Queen of Country and reminded fans how she got that title.

Loretta Lynn to be inducted into George D. Hay Music Hall of Fame

by Linda Ward

Loretta Lynn

From the poverty of the hills of Butcher Hollow, Ky., to an icon in the country music world, Loretta Lynn is a true country music star who forged the way for strong, independent women in country music. Whether it was on stage in her neighborhood church or the Grand Ole Opry, on the big screen or the small screen, Lynn has won the hearts and devotion of all country music fans.

Her career began in local clubs where, backed by a band led by her brother, Jay Lee Webb, Lynn sang her own songs. Her first single, Im a Honky Tonk Girl, was recorded on the Zero Record Company label, started by Norm Burley just to record Lynn. The 1959 (should be 1960) single became a hit due to the hard work of Lynn and her husband, Oliver Mooney Lynn, as they sent out thousands of copies to radio stations and traveled from station to station urging the disk jockeys to play the song. This attracted the attention of the Wilburn brothers who invited Loretta Lynn to tour with them in 1960 and advised her to move to Nashville.

After five decades, Lynn is still entertaining and continues to entrance audiences. She has given a voice to womens concerns through songs like Fist City, and You Aint Woman Enough, as well as Dont Come Home ADrinkin (with Lovin on Your Mind).

Her biography posted on her official website said, Such hits were early hints of Lorettas undeniably strong female point of viewa perspective unique at the time both to country music specifically and to pop music generally and a trend in her music that became further pronounced as she began to write more of her own songs. In her first self-penned song to crack the Top 10, 1966s Dear Uncle Sam, Loretta presented herself as a woman who was going to fight to keep what was important to her, even if that meant questioning the wisdom of her government. Indeed, Dear Uncle Sam was among the very first recordings to recount the human costs of the Vietnam War(The song made a return to Lynns live sets with the coming of the Iraq war.)

Loretta Lynns story came to life in her book and the motion picture Coal Miners Daughter that told of her childhood struggle and the adult success. In her country music career she can count 52 top 10 hits and 16 number ones. Through songs like Youre Lookin at Country and her gospel music she has spoken her heart, her George D. Hay Music Hall of Fame nomination biography said.

October Song Fest At Loretta Lynn's Ranch Sign Ups

Folks from all over are invited to come to Loretta Lynns Ranch at Hurricane Mills for three days of camping, food and fun this October 2-4. The October Fest at Loretta Lynns Ranch is several events in one. Its 3 days of live music performances, dancing, Classes, Door Prizes. Canned Goods and Pie judging. Games booths and more.


Songwriters from the novice to the pro will share their original songs on multiple outdoor stages. Hit Writers from the past, present and future will be showcasing their tunes with live music. There are Open Sing Rings that Song Wranglers can join in or start. There is a Co-writers Corner for on the spot writing and sharing a new tune. If ya still can't sleep after all the stages close there is an after hours Camp Fire Sing Ring down by the creek. The Fest welcomes all forms of songwriting. Everyone who comes will have an opportunity to share their original lyrics, songs or music.


You can also register to attend 3 days of classes all about the craft and businesses of being a songwriter. Pro Instructors who have been there, done that, will share their secrets and personal experiences about what it takes to be successful in the business of music. Attend all or parts.

There will also be dance bands Friday and Saturday night with door Prizes. Sunday morning to afternoon is Gospel and Contemporary Christian singing . Sign your church group or individuals to come sing and play.

There will be Home Canned Goods and Pie Judging competition. Register your Pickles, Bean Relish, Green Beans, Jellies and other home made canned goods for a chance at the Blue Ribbon and other prizes. Apple, Peach and Pumpkin pies will also be judged.

Try your luck at the Watermelon Seed Spitting, Skillet Toss, Golf Chip Shot, Horse Shoe Toss, Ugly Contest, Balloon Toss and other family activities. Arts, Crafts & Music booths of all kinds will be on hand for your browsing pleasure.

And if that werent enough to do..... Loretta Lynns Dude Ranch is complete with a Full Service RV Park & Campsites, Swimming Pool, Playgrounds, Canoeing, Paddle Boats, Nature Trails, Mini Theater, Lynn Plantation Home, Butcher Holler Home Place, “Coal Miners Daughter Museum.” The Old Grist Mill Water Wheel Houses, Fan Museum, Western Town and more.

So come hang with the gang for the three day weekend & find your place in the mix. We are located about 65 miles due west from Nashville and east of Jackson. The October Fest at Loretta Lynns Ranch is now accepting sign ups for performing & non performing songwriters, classes, Gospel singing and general admissions, booths, canned food and pie entries, skillet toss, seed spiting and more for the October 2-4, '09 happening. For information visit www.SongWritersFestival.com or call 931-296-4067 / 615-424-1491 or email Ranch@SongWritersFestival.com

Taylor Swift and Joe Jonas To Star In Remake of "Coal Miner's Daughter"

image for Taylor Swift and Joe Jonas To Star In Remake of "Coal Miner's Daughter"
Loretta Lynn's grandfather Cornelius Lynn who taught her how to play the guitar, sit like a lady, and make moonshine
HOLLYWOOD - Free Spirited Flamboyant Films has announced that Taylor Swift and Joe Jonas will be starring as Loretta Lynn and Doolittle Lynn in the remake of the 1980 country music film Coal Miner's Daughter which starred Sissy Spacek and Tommy Lee Jones.Taylor said that her and Joe visited Butcher Holler,Kentucky where Loretta lived. Taylor said that she was amazed at all the moonshine stills that were literally sitting all over the place. She was also taken back by the fact that a lot of the backwoods folks had no earthly idea who she and Joe (Jonas) were.

Jonas said that at first the Kentucky people figured that they were just a couple of persistent (and lost) as heck Jehovah's Witnesses.

The two young celebrities then traveled down to Cumberland County, which is located on the Kentucky-Tennessee border. They went way back into the backwoods and visited the one-room mountain shack of Pardell and Emily Flora Yazoo.

Pardell is a self-employed moonshiner and Emily Flora says that she works at poppin' out 'younguns.'

Jonas said that The Yazoo's live way up on a mountaintop about 52 miles from the nearest highway or person.The Yazoo's have 17 children. see The 17 Yazoo Kids of Cumberland County, Kentucky The eldest is a boy named Aurora and the second oldest is a girl named Wilmer. When Pardell Bob was asked why they would name a boy Aurora and a girl Wilmer he replied "Beats the squirrel shit out of me, I guess you just best better goes and ask my 'wife lady.'"

When Emily Flora was asked why she named her son Aurora and her daughter Wilmer she replied that ever since she was a little 'youngun' of four, she just liked the names and she really had no idea if they was (her word) boys' names or girls' names. She smiled and said that she just reckoned (her word) that she had a 50/50 chance.

Taylor said that Emily Flora fixed her and Joe a plate of possum inners, barbecued okra, fried squirrel nuts, mouthwaterin' chicken beak biscuits, and mama woodchuck mouth.

After they finished it all up and had themselves a second helpin' they both thanked Emily Flora and Pardel for their wonderul hospitality. They said that they had to get back to Beverly Hills. Pardell's ears perked up and he said, "Hey, so y'all's hill folk to. Well by crackies if that ain't a dad gum kick in the sweaty butt of my britches!"

SIDENOTE: Taylor said that she wanted for Pardell and Emily Flora to fly to Hollywood and portray her parents in the movie. Emily Flora declined because she said that she had never been in a car and she was afraid that once she got in she may not be able to get out. Pardell said that he didn't want to get in a car either cause he once heard tell that there ain't no-wheres to spit your tabacky juice.

O'Donnell finds huge market for old tunes


"This kind of music" includes traditional Irish songs like Green Glens of Antrim and Danny Boy, '60s rock 'n' roll, Kitty Wells, Charley Pride and Loretta Lynn covers. For many Irish, old-country music and their own homegrown brand are inextricably linked. Anyone who visits Dublin or Belfast, or even Glasgow, Scotland, where there's a considerable Irish population, will see country fans as serious as anyone in Nashville.

It shouldn't come as a shock; O'Donnell points out that both forms of music rely on stories, and that in musicological terms, they're also close cousins.

"If you listen to traditional Irish and Scottish, it's very much like bluegrass," he notes.

North America, and especially PBS, has been good to O'Donnell in the last few years, and he acknowledges his debt to the TV network.

"It likely would not have happened if it wasn't for the concert specials I've done. Because of that I've been able to do so much here, including meeting some of my heroes, like Loretta Lynn.

"I just adore her--and I've gotten to work with her as well. It really doesn't get any better than that."

Kellie Pickler Meets a Real American Idol

by Joyce Rizer 
Another of Kellie Pickler's childhood dreams came true last Friday when she discovered she was sharing the bill of Canada's Havelock Country Jamboree with the legendary Loretta Lynn, whom she'd never met.

A lifelong fan, Kellie spent time before the show on Loretta's bus. She tells The Boot that the meeting was everything she could have hoped for. "She's so personable, and so real! I think it's really cool when you meet someone you're a fan of, especially when you've followed their career and bought their records, and had their posters on your wall and worn their t-shirts."
Kellie received a special souvenir of the visit - albeit a temporary one. "She kissed me on the cheek! She wears the same color lipstick as my grandma did. I left her kiss print on my cheek for my show," Kellie says with a giggle. "I didn't wash my face for days!"

By comparison to Loretta's four decades in country music, Kellie is a relative newbie to the business, and she took advantage of the opportunity to learn from the Country Music Hall of Famer. "Being able to sit on the side of the stage and watch Loretta's show, I just learned so much. It's not about all the bells and whistles, it's just her, and her band, and her songs," Kellie says.

The surprise meeting cements Kellie's belief that she's doing what she was born to do. "I fall in love with this [industry] all the time," says the singer. "When I met Dolly [Parton], I fell in love with country music again. When I met Loretta... when I sat on the side of the stage and watched her sing, I fell in love with it all over again. When I think it doesn't get any better than this, damned if it doesn't!"  
according to CMT.She raved about meeting Loretta Lynn at a fair in Canada, and told us Lynn wants to write songs with her. Pickler summed up the story (which she rarely does) by saying that if she's in the business long enough, she hopes that people will consider her as genuine in person as they do when she's onstage, just like Loretta Lynn.

Coal Miner's Daughter back

Posted By BRENDAN WEDLEY , EXAMINER STAFF WRITER


Music bridged the generations at the Havelock Country Jamboree yesterday with teenagers singing along with country music icon Loretta Lynn and older adults cheering relative newcomer Kellie Pickler.

Mary Anne Joyce, a Peterborough resident who has been going to the Jamboree each year for the past 18 years with her friend Maureen Bates, commented on the number of young people singing along with Lynn.

"When she sangCoal Miner's Daughter,it gave me shivers," Joyce said.

Coal Miner's Daughteris Lynn's signature song and the title of the Oscar-winning movie of her life.

Joyce and Bates recalled the last time Lynn performed at the jamboree 14 years ago.

"She came out in a white gown last time. She's a grand lady," Joyce said.

The 74-year-old musician and songwriter told the audience that she lost her voice the night before but the audience cheered her on as she performed hits such asYou're Looking at Country, You Ain't Woman Enough andHonky Tonk Girl.

Lynn charmed the audience with her humour and modesty.

"That song hit the Top 10. Don't ask me how, but it did," she said after singingHonky Tonk Girl.

During one break between songs, she apologized for her voice.

"You'd all pay me to get off stage wouldn't you?" she said.

The crowd immediately called out: "No."

"Well gee whiz, I thought you would," Lynn responded before continuing her performance.

Canadian country music artist Charlie Major performed before Lynn.

Even with the heat, it was a pretty lively crowd, Major said as he tried to cool down following his set.

"They're all favourites," he said of his songs. "Most of them are Number 1 songs or Top 10 songs. Everybody pretty well knows them all."

Major has won several Canadian Country Music Awards and Juno Awards for country male vocalist of the year in 1994 and 1995.

His last album wasShadows and Lightin 2006.

Major said he's slowed down a bit and only performs on weekends but he doesn't plan to stop any time soon.

"I've been doing it all my life. People retire from something they don't like doing and end up doing something they like, so I've already kind of retired years ago," he said.

Despite headliners such as Lynn, Pickler and Randy Travis, Peterborough residents Joyce and Bates said they were disappointed with the lineup for the 20th annual Jamboree.

"It's not that great of a lineup this year," Joyce said.

"They've all been here before," Bates added.

A group of young adults from the Lindsay area stood off to one side of the audience waiting for Craig Morgan to perform after Lynn finished her set.

"The lineup is really good," Leanna Richards said, adding it was her first time at the Jamboree.

"I'm a huge Randy Travis fan," Bob Hollinger said, standing next to his friends, Laura Archer, Victoria Ford and Jessica Howell.



Loretta Song TOP 10

Top Ten Father/Daughter Songs


1.

Tom Petty
 
Wildflowers

2.

Paul Simon
 
Father and Daughter

3.

Hem
 
The Part Where You
Let Go
 

4. Wilco My Darling

5.

Bruce Springsteen
 
When You Need Me

6.

Bob Dylan
 
Forever Young

7.

Neil young
 
Long May You Run

8.

Loudon Wainwright III
 
Daughter

9.

Loretta Lynn
 
"They Dont Make Em Like My Daddy Anymore"

10. Allman Brothers Soulshine

Loretta Set to release two CD's

Loretta Lynn planning to release two albums this year


Legendary singer/songwriter
Loretta Lynn
 
, now 74 years old, hasn't released an album since 2004's Grammy-winning, critically-adored Van Lear Rosea collaboration with Jack White. But 2009 is turning out to be especially fruitful for her, with two albums planned for release by the summer, in an ode to her prolific days in the '60s and '70s.
The first record, which will be a proper country album, could be done by late spring. "(A friend) told me: 'Loretta, don't quit writing, because if you do, no one in Nashville is writing songs,'" Lynn told Billboard. "I write about what's happening today and how I feel."

The second record will be re-recordings of her collection of No. 1 hits, including "Dear Uncle Sam" and a host of others. Lynn said the album will serve as a tribute to her fans, who zealously shout out requests during concerts. "I want to make sure that they get all the old No. 1 hits over the years," she says. "They holler for them."

Lynn went on to tell Billboard she keeps in touch with White, her Van Lear Rose producer. They don't see each other often, but Lynn plans to phone him soon and "see what the devil he's up to." Meanwhile, Lynn has a number of tour dates scheduled in the coming months (she's a busy lady).

Gold Miner

Loretta Lynn

Jack White Finds Gold With The Coal Miner's Daughter


Genius is a peculiar thing. Even the most brilliant musicians can drift into stagnant creative waters, leaving them out of step with both the spirit of their seminal work and the contemporary artists theyve inspired. It happened to

Bob Dylan;
 
it happened to
Johnny Cash
 
. And while she never became desperate enough to file for artistic bankruptcy by re-recording her old hits or doing a covers album, some would say it happened to
Loretta Lynn
 
.

I think its hard for a lot of us out of her world to realize how much she has been lauded and how much acclaim she has gotten in her life, says Jack White, producer of Lynns latest, Van Lear Rose. Shes won so many awards and sold so many records and had so many people tell her how amazing she is. Thats a hard thing to deal with when people do that to you, he says, undoubtedly having encountered the same in the media- and critical-frenzy surrounding

The White Stripes
 
. You start to lose appreciation of what it is that you do, and you kind of become this thing that its hard to say what it is. But I think she has a really strong knowledge of her storytelling being appealing to people, and when she puts that in her music and when she tells it like it is, people go for that. I know she knows that.

Still, thats the danger in being an icon: No matter how compelling your current work is, youre continually being measured against yourself and your legacy. But just as producer Rick Rubin knew how to reclaim the innate power in Johnny Cashs music by stripping it down to its essence, someone outside the Nashville establishment realized creating another classic Loretta Lynn album meant once again pairing her inimitable persona with her voices undiluted purity and her songwritings naked honesty. As unlikely as the coupling may seemof Appalachia with Detroit rock; a 70-year-old country-music legend with a guitar god whos celebrity tabloid fodderthe sound of Van Lear Rose couldnt be more natural.

A household name who hasnt had a Top 40 hit in 19 years, Loretta Lynn inhabits a unique place in the American landscape. As an icon whose life story plays late at night on classic movie channels, its easy to forget that 42 years have passed since her first hit, virtually leaving her a living relic from country musics heralded past. Still, her legacy commands respect, whether earning her an invitation to the Kennedy Center Honors or the tributes of every would-be diva performing in Nashvilles dives. Great new album or not, its difficult not to be at least a little intimidated by her, even over the phone.

OK, are you ready to talk to Loretta? asks a particularly harried publicist, lending the moment even more nervous anticipation. The next voice I hear is Lynns. Matt, are you ready for me now?

She laughs disarmingly, seemingly amused by any notion of her grandeur. On this day, shes fresh from a David Letterman appearance with Jack White and

the Do-Whaters
 
(so named by Lynn because of their ability to do whatever she wanted as a backing band), making a brief stop before heading back out on the road. Im home right now, and were leaving maybe tomorrow I think, she says, apparently a bit disoriented by the whirlwind of press and acclaim that has returned her to magazine covers and radio playlists. I just got in last night from New York. We went up and done all that TV stuff.

No doubt
 
, their performance of Portland, Oregona curiously unwinding duet with White, as much wall-of-sound as it is honky-tonk, that weaves through a minute-and-a-half intro before Lynns entryprovided a moment of pop-culture trivia. I tell her as much when I mention I saw the performance. Oh, did you? she laughs. I went back to the hotel, and I missed it because I fell off to sleep waitin for it.

Having gotten friendly with the country legend after Lynn invited The White Stripes for a homemade dinner at her Nashville ranch (after her manager noticed that the blues-rock experimentalists dedicated their breakthrough White Blood Cells album to her in the liner notes), White immediately proved himself with his near encyclopedic knowledge of Lynns recorded canon and the history of country music as well. He loves it, and he does have respect for it, she says, having been particularly flattered by a red-and-white cowboy suit White made to wear in tribute to her in preparation for their performing together. And he can sit down and talk to you about any country artist you want to talk about. And that kind of shocked me, too. He went and saw my movie when he was nine years old. And he said he thought then, Well, if I ever see Loretta, Im going to try to play in her band.

When the Stripes asked Lynn to open for them at one of their sold-out New York City appearances, casual conversation revealed that Lynns next project was without a producer. White was quick to volunteer for the job. So thats when they said, Hey, why dont we try this out? And I was so surprised, White says with believable modesty. I was so sure they wouldnt let me do it.

While he seems a bundle of bristling creative energy and unapproachable outsider cool when fronting what is arguably Americas most-lauded rock act, you can almost see the 15-year-old in him as he rifles through stacks of dusty vinyl LPs, remembering the summer 2003 recording sessions. It was insane. It was amazing, he gushes. It happened so fast, I had to stop myself every hour and remind myselfyoure recording Loretta Lynn! Youre producing Loretta Lynn right now. I had to keep reminding myself so I could enjoy it. It was happening so fast that I didnt want to say, Wow. I didnt even get a chance to enjoy what was happening. Still, while he may have wanted to savor every moment with the country-music legend, reaching his objectives was going to deliberately limit the time they spent in the studio.

Two nights before I was heading down to Nashville to start working with her, I just laid on my back on the floor, and I listened to the whole record that they sent up, he explains. And I just kept thinking, What am I going to do? How can I present these songs that would serve Loretta best? I started putting the band together before that, so I thought, I know I have guys that can play this well. I just have to make sure that we keep things simple and do it as fast as possible and do it on the eight-track. Just keeping everything really simple and not overthinking or overproducing is the best thing to do. Knowing what not to do is one of my theories. And while recording with a sense of immediacy has remained his modus operandi with The White Stripes, he admits it took some persuading to get Lynn to see the advantage of going back to older recording standards. Some of them, she said, OK I guess so, he says, conveying her hesitance about creating a record so defiantly outside the current Nashville system. Im not a fan of modern technology and modern recording techniques; it just doesnt appeal to me because its so far away from soulfulness.

Its in the wrong direction for any artist. I think that the way we did it let Lorettas voice come out, and you could tell that these things were happening live in the studio and there was a warm feeling. We did it in a house, and you can feel all of those things. For Lynn, the approach couldnt have been more different from that of her other famous producer.

You know what, this is really weird, she says with a tone that pulls you in and makes you feel like shes telling you a secret the two of you will share. When I worked with Owen Bradley, Owen would make me sing a song three times before wed even try it on tape. And Jack, we walked in and I didnt know what he was doing. I thought he was going to let me go over a song three or four times and then wed record it. I sang it one time and that was it, she says in disbelief. One time and that was all! I said to Jack, Jack, we need to do this at least two or three times. And he said, No. That aint right. We did every one of them one time and that was it.

White concurs. Shed usually do a lot of takes, and I said, Well, theres no point in us trying to perfect this, he explains. Sometimes wed get a really great take, and shed want to go back and do it again. Shed say, Oh, I didnt sing that line very good. And Id say, Well, Loretta, its really great. I think its wonderful, and everyone here thinks its great. There really is no reason for us to redo it and miss out on all the things that are in there, just to fix one little thing. Thats soulful to me. I like things like that. In her mind, it wasnt perfect. In my mind it already was.

Still, even though Lynn was uncomfortable with a process that emphasized the raw vulnerability of her musical aesthetic over the polish of modern recording technology, her faith in her new friend prevailed. You know what, I never give it one thought, because I figured Jack was a smart boy. I knew whatever hed do, it would be right. He wanted it to be like I used to record and not like the country artists record today. Consequently, Van Lear Rose offers everything thats characterized Lynns best work, being both vulnerable and defiant, spiritual and carnal, timely and timeless. Its one of those rare recordings that can unite disparate demographics, with enough integrity to please longtime Lynn fans and enough visceral drive to appeal to Whites rock following. And while she hasnt received this kind of attention for the better part of two decades, Lynn has little fear that her faithful following will hesitate to rub shoulders with a different crowd.

If youve got fans that love you, theyre going to stay behind you no matter what happens, Lynn explains. And they love this record. Theyll holler from the audience, Is Jack White with you?that would be the girls. And I say, No, honey, he wouldnt come on this trip, she giggles. Soon, though, Whites childhood predilection will come to pass, as he and his handpicked Detroit indie-rock ringers will accompany Lynn out on the road.

Given how well the first collaboration came out, as well as Lynns prolific pace, rumors are already circulating that another release is in the offing. Of the first 13 he heard, those are the ones he took, she says of the batch of demos she sent White before the recording sessions. He didnt wait. I wrote two or three others, like two or three months before, but he didnt get around to them. And those were ones that I was going to put on the album but well put them on the next one, she sighs contentedly.

It may have taken the prodding of a producer who wasnt even born when Lynn was at the apex of her career, but that same innate genius that seemed to so effortlessly and accurately catalog a life lived simply and sincerely has once again become the defining element in the mix of her album. I think some of them I could have sung better, but Jack swore I couldnt, she says, apparently still a little bewildered by the commotion surrounding an album so humbly made. But hes a fan, and what are you going to tell a fan? It aint hurtin it any, so I aint going to complain.

Loretta One of the Top Living Songwriters

42LORETTA LYNN

Well sloe gin fizz works mighty fast / When you drink it by the pitcher and not by the glass

When I was little, my father routinely came home a-drinkin with lovin on his mind. My mother hated it, but her quiet, private nature and our rural isolation would allow only one allyLoretta Lynnto offer advice and consent. Her lyrics commanded our attention because they accomplished the aims Horace set out for literature: They delighted and instructed. Ages later, the poet James Weldon Johnson described the best Southern writing as universally shared sensationslove, hope, longing, despairexpressed in a clear, familiar and colloquial voice, rooted in the realities of life, whether Lynns at Butcher Hollow or my mothers on Bend of the River Road. The trick of great writing is in this transcendence, and Loretta Lynns success at loading the universe, eternity and ultimate ideals onto words that may also be bender-specificapplicable to one womans heartache after one husbands thoughtlessnessis what has sustained her as a poet, watchful and alert to the vagaries of a womans inconstant self-worth. Kaye Gibbons

GETYou Aint Woman Enough (To Take My Man) (1966), Portland, Oregon (2004)